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Title: The inside-out growth of the most massive galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.9

Abstract

We study the surface brightness profiles of a sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with 0.3 < z < 0.9. The BCGs are selected from the first Red-sequence Cluster Survey and an X-ray cluster survey. The surface brightness profiles of the BCGs are measured using HST ACS images, and the majority of them can be well modeled by a single Sérsic profile with a typical Sérsic index n ∼ 6 and a half-light radius ∼30 kpc. Although the single Sérsic model fits the profiles well, we argue that the systematics in the sky background measurement and the coupling between the model parameters make the comparison of the best-fit model parameters ambiguous. Direct comparison of the BCG profiles, on the other hand, has revealed an inside-out growth for these most massive galaxies: as the mass of a BCG increases, the central mass density of the galaxy increases slowly (ρ{sub 1kpc}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 0.39}), while the slope of the outer profile grows continuously shallower (α{sub r{sup 1}{sup /}{sup 4}}∝M{sub ∗}{sup −2.5}). Such a fashion of growth continues down to the less massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) as a smooth function of galaxy mass, without apparent distinction between BCGs and non-BCGs. For the very massivemore » ETGs and BCGs, the slope of the Kormendy relation starts to trace the slope of the surface brightness profiles and becomes insensitive to subtle profile evolution. These results are generally consistent with dry mergers being the major driver of the mass growth for BCGs and massive ETGs. We also find strong correlations between the richness of clusters and the properties of BCGs: the more massive the clusters are, the more massive the BCGs (M{sub bcg}{sup ∗}∝M{sub clusters}{sup 0.6}) and the shallower their surface brightness profiles. After taking into account the bias in the cluster samples, we find the masses of the BCGs have grown by at least a factor of 1.5 from z = 0.5 to z = 0, in contrast to the previous findings of no evolution. Such an evolution validates the expectation from the ΛCDM model.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8]
  1. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States)
  3. Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)
  4. South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa)
  5. Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, UCB-389, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)
  6. Instituto de Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avenida Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile)
  7. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)
  8. Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365670
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 789; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BRIGHTNESS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CORRELATIONS; DENSITY; EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; GALAXY CLUSTERS; MASS; SURFACES; VISIBLE RADIATION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Bai, Lei, Yee, H. K. C., Li, I. H., Yan, Renbin, Lee, Eve, Gilbank, David G., Ellingson, E., Barrientos, L. F., Gladders, M. D., and Hsieh, B. C., E-mail: leibai@gmail.com. The inside-out growth of the most massive galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.9. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/134.
Bai, Lei, Yee, H. K. C., Li, I. H., Yan, Renbin, Lee, Eve, Gilbank, David G., Ellingson, E., Barrientos, L. F., Gladders, M. D., & Hsieh, B. C., E-mail: leibai@gmail.com. The inside-out growth of the most massive galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.9. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/134.
Bai, Lei, Yee, H. K. C., Li, I. H., Yan, Renbin, Lee, Eve, Gilbank, David G., Ellingson, E., Barrientos, L. F., Gladders, M. D., and Hsieh, B. C., E-mail: leibai@gmail.com. Thu . "The inside-out growth of the most massive galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.9". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/134.
@article{osti_22365670,
title = {The inside-out growth of the most massive galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.9},
author = {Bai, Lei and Yee, H. K. C. and Li, I. H. and Yan, Renbin and Lee, Eve and Gilbank, David G. and Ellingson, E. and Barrientos, L. F. and Gladders, M. D. and Hsieh, B. C., E-mail: leibai@gmail.com},
abstractNote = {We study the surface brightness profiles of a sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with 0.3 < z < 0.9. The BCGs are selected from the first Red-sequence Cluster Survey and an X-ray cluster survey. The surface brightness profiles of the BCGs are measured using HST ACS images, and the majority of them can be well modeled by a single Sérsic profile with a typical Sérsic index n ∼ 6 and a half-light radius ∼30 kpc. Although the single Sérsic model fits the profiles well, we argue that the systematics in the sky background measurement and the coupling between the model parameters make the comparison of the best-fit model parameters ambiguous. Direct comparison of the BCG profiles, on the other hand, has revealed an inside-out growth for these most massive galaxies: as the mass of a BCG increases, the central mass density of the galaxy increases slowly (ρ{sub 1kpc}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 0.39}), while the slope of the outer profile grows continuously shallower (α{sub r{sup 1}{sup /}{sup 4}}∝M{sub ∗}{sup −2.5}). Such a fashion of growth continues down to the less massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) as a smooth function of galaxy mass, without apparent distinction between BCGs and non-BCGs. For the very massive ETGs and BCGs, the slope of the Kormendy relation starts to trace the slope of the surface brightness profiles and becomes insensitive to subtle profile evolution. These results are generally consistent with dry mergers being the major driver of the mass growth for BCGs and massive ETGs. We also find strong correlations between the richness of clusters and the properties of BCGs: the more massive the clusters are, the more massive the BCGs (M{sub bcg}{sup ∗}∝M{sub clusters}{sup 0.6}) and the shallower their surface brightness profiles. After taking into account the bias in the cluster samples, we find the masses of the BCGs have grown by at least a factor of 1.5 from z = 0.5 to z = 0, in contrast to the previous findings of no evolution. Such an evolution validates the expectation from the ΛCDM model.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/134},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 789,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Thu Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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