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Title: The Gaia inertial reference frame and the tilting of the Milky Way disk

Abstract

While the precise relationship between the Milky Way disk and the symmetry planes of the dark matter halo remains somewhat uncertain, a time-varying disk orientation with respect to an inertial reference frame seems probable. Hierarchical structure formation models predict that the dark matter halo is triaxial and tumbles with a characteristic rate of ∼2 rad H{sub 0}{sup −1} (∼30 μas yr{sup –1}). These models also predict a time-dependent accretion of gas, such that the angular momentum vector of the disk should be misaligned with that of the halo. These effects, as well as tidal effects of the LMC, will result in the rotation of the angular momentum vector of the disk population with respect to the quasar reference frame. We assess the accuracy with which the positions and proper motions from Gaia can be referred to a kinematically non-rotating system, and show that the spin vector of the transformation from any rigid self-consistent catalog frame to the quasi-inertial system defined by quasars should be defined to better than 1 μas yr{sup –1}. Determination of this inertial frame by Gaia will reveal any signature of the disk orientation varying with time, improve models of the potential and dynamics of the Milkymore » Way, test theories of gravity, and provide new insights into the orbital evolution of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)
  2. Lund Observatory, Box 43, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365655
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 789; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCURACY; CATALOGS; COSMOLOGY; GRAVITATION; MAGELLANIC CLOUDS; MILKY WAY; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; PROPER MOTION; QUASARS; ROTATION; SPACE VEHICLES; SPIN; SYMMETRY; TIME DEPENDENCE; TRANSFORMATIONS

Citation Formats

Perryman, Michael, Spergel, David N., and Lindegren, Lennart, E-mail: mac.perryman@gmail.com. The Gaia inertial reference frame and the tilting of the Milky Way disk. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/166.
Perryman, Michael, Spergel, David N., & Lindegren, Lennart, E-mail: mac.perryman@gmail.com. The Gaia inertial reference frame and the tilting of the Milky Way disk. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/166.
Perryman, Michael, Spergel, David N., and Lindegren, Lennart, E-mail: mac.perryman@gmail.com. Thu . "The Gaia inertial reference frame and the tilting of the Milky Way disk". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/166.
@article{osti_22365655,
title = {The Gaia inertial reference frame and the tilting of the Milky Way disk},
author = {Perryman, Michael and Spergel, David N. and Lindegren, Lennart, E-mail: mac.perryman@gmail.com},
abstractNote = {While the precise relationship between the Milky Way disk and the symmetry planes of the dark matter halo remains somewhat uncertain, a time-varying disk orientation with respect to an inertial reference frame seems probable. Hierarchical structure formation models predict that the dark matter halo is triaxial and tumbles with a characteristic rate of ∼2 rad H{sub 0}{sup −1} (∼30 μas yr{sup –1}). These models also predict a time-dependent accretion of gas, such that the angular momentum vector of the disk should be misaligned with that of the halo. These effects, as well as tidal effects of the LMC, will result in the rotation of the angular momentum vector of the disk population with respect to the quasar reference frame. We assess the accuracy with which the positions and proper motions from Gaia can be referred to a kinematically non-rotating system, and show that the spin vector of the transformation from any rigid self-consistent catalog frame to the quasi-inertial system defined by quasars should be defined to better than 1 μas yr{sup –1}. Determination of this inertial frame by Gaia will reveal any signature of the disk orientation varying with time, improve models of the potential and dynamics of the Milky Way, test theories of gravity, and provide new insights into the orbital evolution of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/166},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 789,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Thu Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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