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Title: Kinematic evolution of simulated star-forming galaxies

Abstract

Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last ∼8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of 'disk settling'. For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art 'zoom in' hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking because the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (σ{sub g}) and increase in ordered rotation (V{sub rot}) with time. The slopes of the relations between both σ{sub g} and V{sub rot} with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success formore » the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling'.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)
  3. Astronomy Department, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)
  4. Steward Observatory, 933 N. Cherry Street, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
  5. Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365542
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 790; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; GALAXIES; MILKY WAY; RED SHIFT; RESOLUTION; ROTATION; SIMULATION; STAR EVOLUTION

Citation Formats

Kassin, Susan A., Brooks, Alyson, Governato, Fabio, Weiner, Benjamin J., and Gardner, Jonathan P., E-mail: kassin@stsci.edu. Kinematic evolution of simulated star-forming galaxies. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/790/2/89.
Kassin, Susan A., Brooks, Alyson, Governato, Fabio, Weiner, Benjamin J., & Gardner, Jonathan P., E-mail: kassin@stsci.edu. Kinematic evolution of simulated star-forming galaxies. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/790/2/89.
Kassin, Susan A., Brooks, Alyson, Governato, Fabio, Weiner, Benjamin J., and Gardner, Jonathan P., E-mail: kassin@stsci.edu. Fri . "Kinematic evolution of simulated star-forming galaxies". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/790/2/89.
@article{osti_22365542,
title = {Kinematic evolution of simulated star-forming galaxies},
author = {Kassin, Susan A. and Brooks, Alyson and Governato, Fabio and Weiner, Benjamin J. and Gardner, Jonathan P., E-mail: kassin@stsci.edu},
abstractNote = {Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last ∼8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of 'disk settling'. For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art 'zoom in' hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking because the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (σ{sub g}) and increase in ordered rotation (V{sub rot}) with time. The slopes of the relations between both σ{sub g} and V{sub rot} with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success for the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling'.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/790/2/89},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 790,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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