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Title: Detection of exomoons through observation of radio emissions

Abstract

In the Jupiter-Io system, the moon's motion produces currents along the field lines that connect it to Jupiter's polar regions. The currents generate and modulate radio emissions along their paths via the electron-cyclotron maser instability. Based on this process, we suggest that such modulation of planetary radio emissions may reveal the presence of exomoons around giant planets in exoplanetary systems. A model explaining the modulation mechanism in the Jupiter-Io system is extrapolated and used to define criteria for exomoon detectability. A cautiously optimistic scenario of the possible detection of such exomoons around Epsilon Eridani b and Gliese 876 b is provided.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. The Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365417
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 791; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DETECTION; EMISSION; EVOLUTION; INSTABILITY; JUPITER PLANET; MICROWAVE AMPLIFIERS; MODULATION; MOON; SATELLITES; STABILITY

Citation Formats

Noyola, J. P., Satyal, S., and Musielak, Z. E., E-mail: joaquin.noyola@mavs.uta.edu, E-mail: ssatyal@uta.edu, E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu. Detection of exomoons through observation of radio emissions. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/1/25.
Noyola, J. P., Satyal, S., & Musielak, Z. E., E-mail: joaquin.noyola@mavs.uta.edu, E-mail: ssatyal@uta.edu, E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu. Detection of exomoons through observation of radio emissions. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/1/25.
Noyola, J. P., Satyal, S., and Musielak, Z. E., E-mail: joaquin.noyola@mavs.uta.edu, E-mail: ssatyal@uta.edu, E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu. Sun . "Detection of exomoons through observation of radio emissions". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/1/25.
@article{osti_22365417,
title = {Detection of exomoons through observation of radio emissions},
author = {Noyola, J. P. and Satyal, S. and Musielak, Z. E., E-mail: joaquin.noyola@mavs.uta.edu, E-mail: ssatyal@uta.edu, E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu},
abstractNote = {In the Jupiter-Io system, the moon's motion produces currents along the field lines that connect it to Jupiter's polar regions. The currents generate and modulate radio emissions along their paths via the electron-cyclotron maser instability. Based on this process, we suggest that such modulation of planetary radio emissions may reveal the presence of exomoons around giant planets in exoplanetary systems. A model explaining the modulation mechanism in the Jupiter-Io system is extrapolated and used to define criteria for exomoon detectability. A cautiously optimistic scenario of the possible detection of such exomoons around Epsilon Eridani b and Gliese 876 b is provided.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/791/1/25},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 791,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Aug 10 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sun Aug 10 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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