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Title: Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae

Abstract

We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), Hδ{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesismore » fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (∼0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)
  2. Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, and Universite P. et M. Curie, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)
  3. GEPI, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F-92195 Meudon (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365379
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 791; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ABSORPTION; ABUNDANCE; APERTURES; CATALOGS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; EMISSION; EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; GALAXY NUCLEI; MASS; SUPERNOVAE; SYNTHESIS; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Shao, X., Liang, Y. C., Chen, X. Y., Zhong, G. H., Deng, L. C., Zhang, B., Shi, W. B., Zhou, L., Dennefeld, M., Hammer, F., and Flores, H., E-mail: xshao@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/1/57.
Shao, X., Liang, Y. C., Chen, X. Y., Zhong, G. H., Deng, L. C., Zhang, B., Shi, W. B., Zhou, L., Dennefeld, M., Hammer, F., & Flores, H., E-mail: xshao@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/1/57.
Shao, X., Liang, Y. C., Chen, X. Y., Zhong, G. H., Deng, L. C., Zhang, B., Shi, W. B., Zhou, L., Dennefeld, M., Hammer, F., and Flores, H., E-mail: xshao@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn. 2014. "Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/1/57.
@article{osti_22365379,
title = {Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae},
author = {Shao, X. and Liang, Y. C. and Chen, X. Y. and Zhong, G. H. and Deng, L. C. and Zhang, B. and Shi, W. B. and Zhou, L. and Dennefeld, M. and Hammer, F. and Flores, H., E-mail: xshao@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn},
abstractNote = {We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), Hδ{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesis fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (∼0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/791/1/57},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 791,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 8
}
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