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Title: EQUATORIAL ZONAL JETS AND JUPITER's GRAVITY

Abstract

The depth of penetration of Jupiter's zonal winds into the planet's interior is unknown. A possible way to determine the depth is to measure the effects of the winds on the planet's high-order zonal gravitational coefficients, a task to be undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. It is shown here that the equatorial winds alone largely determine these coefficients which are nearly independent of the depth of the non-equatorial winds.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Key Laboratory of Planetary Sciences, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China)
  2. Center for Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QE (United Kingdom)
  3. Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365317
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 791; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DEPTH; GRAVITATION; JETS; JUPITER PLANET; SATELLITE ATMOSPHERES; SATELLITES; WIND

Citation Formats

Kong, D., Liao, X., Zhang, K., and Schubert, G. EQUATORIAL ZONAL JETS AND JUPITER's GRAVITY. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/791/2/L24.
Kong, D., Liao, X., Zhang, K., & Schubert, G. EQUATORIAL ZONAL JETS AND JUPITER's GRAVITY. United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/791/2/L24.
Kong, D., Liao, X., Zhang, K., and Schubert, G. Wed . "EQUATORIAL ZONAL JETS AND JUPITER's GRAVITY". United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/791/2/L24.
@article{osti_22365317,
title = {EQUATORIAL ZONAL JETS AND JUPITER's GRAVITY},
author = {Kong, D. and Liao, X. and Zhang, K. and Schubert, G.},
abstractNote = {The depth of penetration of Jupiter's zonal winds into the planet's interior is unknown. A possible way to determine the depth is to measure the effects of the winds on the planet's high-order zonal gravitational coefficients, a task to be undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. It is shown here that the equatorial winds alone largely determine these coefficients which are nearly independent of the depth of the non-equatorial winds.},
doi = {10.1088/2041-8205/791/2/L24},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 791,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 20 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed Aug 20 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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