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Title: POLARIZED LIGHT IMAGING OF THE HD 142527 TRANSITION DISK WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER: DUST AROUND THE CLOSE-IN COMPANION

Abstract

When giant planets form, they grow by accreting gas and dust. HD 142527 is a young star that offers a scaled-up view of this process. It has a broad, asymmetric ring of gas and dust beyond ∼100 AU and a wide inner gap. Within the gap, a low-mass stellar companion orbits the primary star at just ∼12 AU, and both the primary and secondary are accreting gas. In an attempt to directly detect the dusty counterpart to this accreted gas, we have observed HD 142527 with the Gemini Planet Imager in polarized light at Y band (0.95-1.14 μm). We clearly detect the companion in total intensity and show that its position and photometry are generally consistent with the expected values. We also detect a point source in polarized light that may be spatially separated by ∼ a few AU from the location of the companion in total intensity. This suggests that dust is likely falling onto or orbiting the companion. Given the possible contribution of scattered light from this dust to previously reported photometry of the companion, the current mass limits should be viewed as upper limits only. If the dust near the companion is eventually confirmed to be spatially separated, this system would resemblemore » a scaled-up version of the young planetary system inside the gap of the transition disk around LkCa 15.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)
  2. Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
  3. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365251
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 791; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASYMMETRY; COSMIC DUST; IMAGES; MASS; OPTICS; ORBITS; PHOTOMETRY; PLANETS; RESOLUTION; STAR ACCRETION; STARS; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Rodigas, Timothy J., Weinberger, Alycia, Follette, Katherine B., Close, Laird, and Hines, Dean C., E-mail: trodigas@carnegiescience.edu. POLARIZED LIGHT IMAGING OF THE HD 142527 TRANSITION DISK WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER: DUST AROUND THE CLOSE-IN COMPANION. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/791/2/L37.
Rodigas, Timothy J., Weinberger, Alycia, Follette, Katherine B., Close, Laird, & Hines, Dean C., E-mail: trodigas@carnegiescience.edu. POLARIZED LIGHT IMAGING OF THE HD 142527 TRANSITION DISK WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER: DUST AROUND THE CLOSE-IN COMPANION. United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/791/2/L37.
Rodigas, Timothy J., Weinberger, Alycia, Follette, Katherine B., Close, Laird, and Hines, Dean C., E-mail: trodigas@carnegiescience.edu. Wed . "POLARIZED LIGHT IMAGING OF THE HD 142527 TRANSITION DISK WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER: DUST AROUND THE CLOSE-IN COMPANION". United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/791/2/L37.
@article{osti_22365251,
title = {POLARIZED LIGHT IMAGING OF THE HD 142527 TRANSITION DISK WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER: DUST AROUND THE CLOSE-IN COMPANION},
author = {Rodigas, Timothy J. and Weinberger, Alycia and Follette, Katherine B. and Close, Laird and Hines, Dean C., E-mail: trodigas@carnegiescience.edu},
abstractNote = {When giant planets form, they grow by accreting gas and dust. HD 142527 is a young star that offers a scaled-up view of this process. It has a broad, asymmetric ring of gas and dust beyond ∼100 AU and a wide inner gap. Within the gap, a low-mass stellar companion orbits the primary star at just ∼12 AU, and both the primary and secondary are accreting gas. In an attempt to directly detect the dusty counterpart to this accreted gas, we have observed HD 142527 with the Gemini Planet Imager in polarized light at Y band (0.95-1.14 μm). We clearly detect the companion in total intensity and show that its position and photometry are generally consistent with the expected values. We also detect a point source in polarized light that may be spatially separated by ∼ a few AU from the location of the companion in total intensity. This suggests that dust is likely falling onto or orbiting the companion. Given the possible contribution of scattered light from this dust to previously reported photometry of the companion, the current mass limits should be viewed as upper limits only. If the dust near the companion is eventually confirmed to be spatially separated, this system would resemble a scaled-up version of the young planetary system inside the gap of the transition disk around LkCa 15.},
doi = {10.1088/2041-8205/791/2/L37},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 791,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 20 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed Aug 20 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}