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Title: REVISITING COINCIDENCE RATE BETWEEN GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOR THE ADVANCED AND THIRD GENERATION

Abstract

We use realistic Monte Carlo simulations including both gravitational-wave (GW) and short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) selection effects to revisit the coincident rate of binary systems composed of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. We show that the fraction of GW triggers that can be observed in coincidence with sGRBs is proportional to the beaming factor at z = 0, but increases with the distance until it reaches 100% at the GW detector horizon distance. When this is taken into account the rate is improved by a factor of three compared to the simple beaming factor correction. We provide an estimate of the performance future GRB detectors should achieve in order to fully exploit the potentiality of the planned third-generation GW antenna Einstein Telescope, and we propose a simple method to constrain the beaming angle of sGRBs.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. UMR ARTEMIS, CNRS, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CS 34229 F-06304 NICE (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364486
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 799; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ANTENNAS; BLACK HOLES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CORRECTIONS; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; DETECTION; DISTANCE; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEUTRON STARS; NEUTRONS; PERFORMANCE; TELESCOPES

Citation Formats

Regimbau, T., Siellez, K., Meacher, D., Gendre, B., and Boër, M., E-mail: regimbau@oca.eu. REVISITING COINCIDENCE RATE BETWEEN GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOR THE ADVANCED AND THIRD GENERATION. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/799/1/69.
Regimbau, T., Siellez, K., Meacher, D., Gendre, B., & Boër, M., E-mail: regimbau@oca.eu. REVISITING COINCIDENCE RATE BETWEEN GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOR THE ADVANCED AND THIRD GENERATION. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/799/1/69.
Regimbau, T., Siellez, K., Meacher, D., Gendre, B., and Boër, M., E-mail: regimbau@oca.eu. Tue . "REVISITING COINCIDENCE RATE BETWEEN GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOR THE ADVANCED AND THIRD GENERATION". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/799/1/69.
@article{osti_22364486,
title = {REVISITING COINCIDENCE RATE BETWEEN GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOR THE ADVANCED AND THIRD GENERATION},
author = {Regimbau, T. and Siellez, K. and Meacher, D. and Gendre, B. and Boër, M., E-mail: regimbau@oca.eu},
abstractNote = {We use realistic Monte Carlo simulations including both gravitational-wave (GW) and short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) selection effects to revisit the coincident rate of binary systems composed of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. We show that the fraction of GW triggers that can be observed in coincidence with sGRBs is proportional to the beaming factor at z = 0, but increases with the distance until it reaches 100% at the GW detector horizon distance. When this is taken into account the rate is improved by a factor of three compared to the simple beaming factor correction. We provide an estimate of the performance future GRB detectors should achieve in order to fully exploit the potentiality of the planned third-generation GW antenna Einstein Telescope, and we propose a simple method to constrain the beaming angle of sGRBs.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/799/1/69},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 799,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Tue Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
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