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Title: SULFURIZATION OF IRON IN THE DYNAMIC SOLAR NEBULA AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANETARY COMPOSITIONS

Abstract

One explanation for the enhanced ratio of volatiles to hydrogen in Jupiter’s atmosphere compared to a a gas of solar composition is that the planet accreted volatile-bearing clathrates during its formation. Models, however, suggest that S would be over abundant if clathrates were the primary carrier of Jupiter’s volatiles. This led to the suggestion that S was depleted in the outer nebula due to the formation troilite (FeS). Here, this depletion is quantitatively explored by modeling the coupled dynamical and chemical evolution of Fe grains in the solar nebula. It is found that disks that undergo rapid radial expansion from an initially compact state may allow sufficient production of FeS and carry H{sub 2}S-depleted gas outward where ices would form, providing the conditions needed for S-depleted clathrates to form. However, this expansion would also carry FeS grains to this region, which could also be incorporated into planetesimals. Thus for clathrates to be a viable source of volatiles, models must account for the presence of both H{sub 2}S in FeS in the outer solar nebula.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of the Geophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364256
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 800; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 2041-8205
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CLATHRATES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; HYDROGEN; HYDROGEN SULFIDES; IRON; IRON SULFIDES; JUPITER PLANET; PROTOPLANETS; SATELLITES; SOLAR NEBULA; STAR EVOLUTION; TROILITE; VOLATILITY

Citation Formats

Ciesla, Fred J., E-mail: fciesla@uchicago.edu. SULFURIZATION OF IRON IN THE DYNAMIC SOLAR NEBULA AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANETARY COMPOSITIONS. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/800/1/L6.
Ciesla, Fred J., E-mail: fciesla@uchicago.edu. SULFURIZATION OF IRON IN THE DYNAMIC SOLAR NEBULA AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANETARY COMPOSITIONS. United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/800/1/L6.
Ciesla, Fred J., E-mail: fciesla@uchicago.edu. Tue . "SULFURIZATION OF IRON IN THE DYNAMIC SOLAR NEBULA AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANETARY COMPOSITIONS". United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/800/1/L6.
@article{osti_22364256,
title = {SULFURIZATION OF IRON IN THE DYNAMIC SOLAR NEBULA AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANETARY COMPOSITIONS},
author = {Ciesla, Fred J., E-mail: fciesla@uchicago.edu},
abstractNote = {One explanation for the enhanced ratio of volatiles to hydrogen in Jupiter’s atmosphere compared to a a gas of solar composition is that the planet accreted volatile-bearing clathrates during its formation. Models, however, suggest that S would be over abundant if clathrates were the primary carrier of Jupiter’s volatiles. This led to the suggestion that S was depleted in the outer nebula due to the formation troilite (FeS). Here, this depletion is quantitatively explored by modeling the coupled dynamical and chemical evolution of Fe grains in the solar nebula. It is found that disks that undergo rapid radial expansion from an initially compact state may allow sufficient production of FeS and carry H{sub 2}S-depleted gas outward where ices would form, providing the conditions needed for S-depleted clathrates to form. However, this expansion would also carry FeS grains to this region, which could also be incorporated into planetesimals. Thus for clathrates to be a viable source of volatiles, models must account for the presence of both H{sub 2}S in FeS in the outer solar nebula.},
doi = {10.1088/2041-8205/800/1/L6},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
issn = {2041-8205},
number = 1,
volume = 800,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {2}
}