skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: STORM IN A {sup T}EACUP{sup :} A RADIO-QUIET QUASAR WITH ≈10 kpc RADIO-EMITTING BUBBLES AND EXTREME GAS KINEMATICS

Abstract

We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) Very Large Array data, combined with VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph integral field unit data and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, of a z = 0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≈ 5 × 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup –1} and L {sub AGN} ≈ 2 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the ''Teacup'' active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the literature. We identify ''bubbles'' of radio emission that are extended ≈10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the ''Teacup'' AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ≈0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v = –740 km s{sup –1}. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicatesmore » that the AGN can also interact with the gas on ≳ 10 kpc scales. Our study highlights that even when a quasar is formally ''radio-quiet'' the radio emission can be extremely effective for observing the effects of AGN feedback.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)
  2. Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifica Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)
  3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S7 3RH (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364232
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 800; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BUBBLES; FEEDBACK; GALAXIES; GALAXY NUCLEI; GHZ RANGE; JETS; MORPHOLOGY; QUASARS; SPACE; STELLAR WINDS; TELESCOPES

Citation Formats

Harrison, C. M., Thomson, A. P., Alexander, D. M., Edge, A. C., Hogan, M. T., Swinbank, A. M., Bauer, F. E., and Mullaney, J. R., E-mail: c.m.harrison@mail.com. STORM IN A {sup T}EACUP{sup :} A RADIO-QUIET QUASAR WITH ≈10 kpc RADIO-EMITTING BUBBLES AND EXTREME GAS KINEMATICS. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/800/1/45.
Harrison, C. M., Thomson, A. P., Alexander, D. M., Edge, A. C., Hogan, M. T., Swinbank, A. M., Bauer, F. E., & Mullaney, J. R., E-mail: c.m.harrison@mail.com. STORM IN A {sup T}EACUP{sup :} A RADIO-QUIET QUASAR WITH ≈10 kpc RADIO-EMITTING BUBBLES AND EXTREME GAS KINEMATICS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/800/1/45.
Harrison, C. M., Thomson, A. P., Alexander, D. M., Edge, A. C., Hogan, M. T., Swinbank, A. M., Bauer, F. E., and Mullaney, J. R., E-mail: c.m.harrison@mail.com. Tue . "STORM IN A {sup T}EACUP{sup :} A RADIO-QUIET QUASAR WITH ≈10 kpc RADIO-EMITTING BUBBLES AND EXTREME GAS KINEMATICS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/800/1/45.
@article{osti_22364232,
title = {STORM IN A {sup T}EACUP{sup :} A RADIO-QUIET QUASAR WITH ≈10 kpc RADIO-EMITTING BUBBLES AND EXTREME GAS KINEMATICS},
author = {Harrison, C. M. and Thomson, A. P. and Alexander, D. M. and Edge, A. C. and Hogan, M. T. and Swinbank, A. M. and Bauer, F. E. and Mullaney, J. R., E-mail: c.m.harrison@mail.com},
abstractNote = {We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) Very Large Array data, combined with VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph integral field unit data and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, of a z = 0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≈ 5 × 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup –1} and L {sub AGN} ≈ 2 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the ''Teacup'' active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the literature. We identify ''bubbles'' of radio emission that are extended ≈10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the ''Teacup'' AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ≈0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v = –740 km s{sup –1}. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicates that the AGN can also interact with the gas on ≳ 10 kpc scales. Our study highlights that even when a quasar is formally ''radio-quiet'' the radio emission can be extremely effective for observing the effects of AGN feedback.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/800/1/45},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 800,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Tue Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
  • To explain the properties of the most massive low-redshift galaxies and the shape of their mass function, recent models of galaxy evolution include strong AGN feedback to complement starburst-driven feedback in massive galaxies. Using the near-infrared integral-field spectrograph SPIFFI on the VLT, we searched for direct evidence for such a feedback in the optical emission line gas around the z = 2.16 powerful radio galaxy MRC1138-262, likely a massive galaxy in formation. The kpc-scale kinematics, with FWHMs and relative velocities {approx}< 2400 km s{sup -1} and nearly spherical spatial distribution, do not resemble large-scale gravitational motion or starburst-driven winds. Order-of-magnitudemore » timescale and energy arguments favor the AGN as the only plausible candidate to accelerate the gas, with a total energy injection of {approx} few x 10{sup 60} ergs or more, necessary to power the outflow, and relatively efficient coupling between radio jet and ISM. Observed outflow properties are in gross agreement with the models, and suggest that AGN winds might have a similar, or perhaps larger, cosmological significance than starburst-driven winds, if MRC1138-262 is indeed archetypal. Moreover, the outflow has the potential to remove significant gas fractions ({approx}< 50%) from a > L* galaxy within a few 10 to 100 Myrs, fast enough to preserve the observed [{alpha}/Fe] overabundance in massive galaxies at low redshift. Using simple arguments, it appears that feedback like that observed in MRC1138-262 may have sufficient energy to inhibit material from infalling into the dark matter halo and thus regulate galaxy growth as required in some recent models of hierarchical structure formation.« less
  • This paper summarizes the data and preliminary results of a three-year project to monitor the continuum variability of GQ Com in the satellite ultraviolet and the associated variability of the Ly-alpha and C IV lines. GQ Com exhibited a twofold increase in flux during a 100-day time span, followed by a decline taking over three times longer. The broad wings of C IV responded quickly to the continuum increase, although the coarseness of the time resolution allows only an upper limit of 50 days to be placed on any time delay between the continuum and the line wings. The responsemore » of the wings of Ly-alpha is not as well defined. In contrast, the cores of both lines lagged the continuum by at least 50-100 days. During the course of the observations, the Ly-alpha line profile underwent considerable changes in shape. The profile changes were also seen in C IV on one occasion. These changes occurred while the continuum was in a low state. The data indicate considerble structure may be present in the broad-line region. 20 refs.« less
  • We report new spectroscopic observations performed in 2010 and 2011 for the luminous radio-quiet quasar PG 1416-129. Our new spectra with high quality cover both H{beta} and H{alpha} regions, and show negligible line profile variation within a timescale of one year. The two spectra allow us to study the variability of the Balmer line profile by comparing the spectra with previous ones taken at 10 and 20 years ago. By decomposing the broad Balmer emission lines into two Gaussian profiles, our spectral analysis suggests a strong response to the continuum level for the very broad component, and significant variations inmore » both bulk blueshift velocity/FWHM and flux for the broad component. The new observations additionally indicate flat Balmer decrements (i.e., too strong H{beta} emission) at the line wings, which is hard to reproduce using recent optically thin models. With these observations we argue that a separate inner optically thin emission-line region might not be necessary in the object to reproduce the observed line profiles.« less
  • We present 1-2 GHz Very Large Array A-configuration continuum observations on the highest redshift quasar known to date, the z = 7.085 quasar ULAS J112001.48+064124.3. The results show no radio continuum emission at the optical position of the quasar or its vicinity at a level of ≥3σ or 23.1 μJy beam{sup –1}. This 3σ limit corresponds to a rest-frame 1.4 GHz luminosity density limit of L {sub ν,} {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} < 1.76 × 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup –1} for a spectral index of α = 0, and L {sub ν,} {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} < 1.42 × 10{supmore » 25} W Hz{sup –1} for a spectral index of α = –1. The rest-frame 1.4 GHz luminosity limits are L {sub rad} < 6.43 × 10{sup 6} L {sub ☉} and L {sub rad} < 5.20 × 10{sup 7} L {sub ☉} for α = 0 and α = –1, respectively. The derived limits for the ratio of the rest-frame 1.4 GHz luminosity density to the B-band optical luminosity density are R{sub 1.4}{sup ∗}<0.53 and <4.30 for the above noted spectral indices, respectively. Given our upper limits on the radio continuum emission and the radio-to-optical luminosity ratio, we conclude that this quasar is radio-quiet and located at the low end of the radio-quiet distribution of high-redshift (z ≳ 6) quasars.« less
  • A Chandra observation of the X-ray bright group NGC 5044 shows that the X-ray emitting gas has been strongly perturbed by recent outbursts from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) and also by motion of the central dominant galaxy relative to the group gas. The NGC 5044 group hosts many small radio-quiet cavities with a nearly isotropic distribution, cool filaments, a semi-circular cold front, and a two-armed spiral shaped feature of cool gas. A Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observation of NGC 5044 at 610 MHz shows the presence of extended radio emission with a 'torus-shaped' morphology. The largest X-raymore » filament appears to thread the radio torus, suggesting that the lower entropy gas within the filament is material being uplifted from the center of the group. The radio emission at 235 MHz is much more extended than the emission at 610 MHz, with little overlap between the two frequencies. One component of the 235 MHz emission passes through the largest X-ray cavity and is then deflected just behind the cold front. A second detached radio lobe is also detected at 235 MHz beyond the cold front. All of the smaller X-ray cavities in the center of NGC 5044 are undetected in the GMRT observations. Since the smaller bubbles are probably no longer momentum driven by the central AGN, their motion will be affected by the group 'weather' as they buoyantly rise outward. Hence, most of the enthalpy within the smaller bubbles will likely be deposited near the group center and isotropized by the group weather. The total mechanical power of the smaller radio quiet cavities is P{sub c} = 9.2 x 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} which is sufficient to suppress about one-half of the total radiative cooling within the central 10 kpc. This is consistent with the presence of Halpha emission within this region which shows that at least some of the gas is able to cool. The mechanical heating power of the larger southern cavity, located between 10 and 20 kpc, is six times greater than the combined mechanical power of the smaller radio-quiet cavities and could suppress all radiative cooling within the central 25 kpc if the energy were deposited and isotropized within this region. Within the central 20 kpc, emission from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) is a significant component of the X-ray emission above 2 keV. The presence of hard X-ray emission from unresolved LMXBs makes it difficult to place strong constraints on the amount of shock heated gas within the X-ray cavities.« less