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Title: SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY

Abstract

The first limits on the prompt emission from the long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A in the >100 GeV energy band are reported. GRB 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift z ≲ 0.5 and featured the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The energy spectrum extends at least up to 95 GeV, clearly in the range observable by the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory, a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. The burst occurred under unfavorable observation conditions, low in the sky and when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, eight different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC detector, which will be completed soon. The detection rate of the full HAWC detector may be as high as one to two GRBs per year. A detection could provide important information regarding the high energy processes atmore » work and the observation of a possible cut-off beyond the Fermi Large Area Telescope energy range could be the signature of gamma-ray absorption, either in the GRB or along the line of sight due to the extragalactic background light.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3]; ; ; ;  [4];  [5];  [6]; ;  [7];  [8];  [9]; ;  [10];  [11]; ;  [12];  [13] more »; ; « less
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)
  2. Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D. F. (Mexico)
  3. CEFyMAP, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico)
  4. Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)
  5. Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States)
  6. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
  7. Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)
  8. Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca, Municipio de Zempoala, Hidalgo (Mexico)
  9. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)
  10. Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)
  11. Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D. F. (Mexico)
  12. Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla (Mexico)
  13. Departamento de Física, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara (Mexico)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364174
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 800; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; DETECTION; DIAGRAMS; ENERGY SPECTRA; EXTENSIVE AIR SHOWERS; GAMMA DETECTION; GAMMA RADIATION; GEV RANGE; MEV RANGE; RED SHIFT; TELESCOPE COUNTERS; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Abeysekara, A. U., Alfaro, R., Alvarez, C., Arceo, R., Álvarez, J. D., Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C., Cotti, U., De León, C., Solares, H. A. Ayala, Barber, A. S., Baughman, B. M., Braun, J., Bautista-Elivar, N., BenZvi, S. Y., Rosales, M. Bonilla, Carramiñana, A., Caballero-Mora, K. S., Castillo, M., Cotzomi, J., De la Fuente, E., E-mail: dirk.lennarz@gatech.edu, Collaboration: HAWC collaboration, and and others. SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/800/2/78.
Abeysekara, A. U., Alfaro, R., Alvarez, C., Arceo, R., Álvarez, J. D., Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C., Cotti, U., De León, C., Solares, H. A. Ayala, Barber, A. S., Baughman, B. M., Braun, J., Bautista-Elivar, N., BenZvi, S. Y., Rosales, M. Bonilla, Carramiñana, A., Caballero-Mora, K. S., Castillo, M., Cotzomi, J., De la Fuente, E., E-mail: dirk.lennarz@gatech.edu, Collaboration: HAWC collaboration, & and others. SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/800/2/78.
Abeysekara, A. U., Alfaro, R., Alvarez, C., Arceo, R., Álvarez, J. D., Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C., Cotti, U., De León, C., Solares, H. A. Ayala, Barber, A. S., Baughman, B. M., Braun, J., Bautista-Elivar, N., BenZvi, S. Y., Rosales, M. Bonilla, Carramiñana, A., Caballero-Mora, K. S., Castillo, M., Cotzomi, J., De la Fuente, E., E-mail: dirk.lennarz@gatech.edu, Collaboration: HAWC collaboration, and and others. Fri . "SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/800/2/78.
@article{osti_22364174,
title = {SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY},
author = {Abeysekara, A. U. and Alfaro, R. and Alvarez, C. and Arceo, R. and Álvarez, J. D. and Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C. and Cotti, U. and De León, C. and Solares, H. A. Ayala and Barber, A. S. and Baughman, B. M. and Braun, J. and Bautista-Elivar, N. and BenZvi, S. Y. and Rosales, M. Bonilla and Carramiñana, A. and Caballero-Mora, K. S. and Castillo, M. and Cotzomi, J. and De la Fuente, E., E-mail: dirk.lennarz@gatech.edu and Collaboration: HAWC collaboration and and others},
abstractNote = {The first limits on the prompt emission from the long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A in the >100 GeV energy band are reported. GRB 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift z ≲ 0.5 and featured the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The energy spectrum extends at least up to 95 GeV, clearly in the range observable by the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory, a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. The burst occurred under unfavorable observation conditions, low in the sky and when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, eight different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC detector, which will be completed soon. The detection rate of the full HAWC detector may be as high as one to two GRBs per year. A detection could provide important information regarding the high energy processes at work and the observation of a possible cut-off beyond the Fermi Large Area Telescope energy range could be the signature of gamma-ray absorption, either in the GRB or along the line of sight due to the extragalactic background light.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/800/2/78},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 800,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Fri Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
  • Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing earlymore » science results.« less
  • The Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources using the observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A. We found that GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest γ-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.
  • We present the first catalog of TeV gamma-ray sources realized with data from the newly completed High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC). It is the most sensitive wide field-of-view TeV telescope currently in operation, with a one-year survey sensitivity of ∼5%–10% of the flux of the Crab Nebula. With an instantaneous field of view >1.5 sr and >90% duty cycle, it continuously surveys and monitors the sky for gamma-ray energies between hundreds of GeV and tens of TeV. HAWC is located in Mexico, at a latitude of 19° N, and was completed in 2015 March. Here, we present the 2HWCmore » catalog, which is the result of the first source search performed with the complete HAWC detector. Realized with 507 days of data, it represents the most sensitive TeV survey to date for such a large fraction of the sky. A total of 39 sources were detected, with an expected number of false detections of 0.5 due to background fluctuation. Out of these sources, 19 are new sources that are not associated with previously known TeV sources (association criteria: <0.°5 away). The source list, including the position measurement, spectrum measurement, and uncertainties, is reported, then each source is briefly discussed. Of the 2HWC associated sources, 10 are reported in TeVCat as PWN or SNR: 2 as blazars and the remaining eight as unidentified.« less
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ∼17 rest-frame days after themore » burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ∼ 15, 000 km s{sup –1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ∼ 30, 000 km s{sup –1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ∼4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.« less