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Title: Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys

Abstract

We propose a new approach to discovering faint microlensing signals below traditional thresholds, and for estimating the binary-lens mass ratio and the apparent separation from such signals. The events found will be helpful in accurately estimating the true distribution of planetary semimajor axes, which is an important goal of space microlensing surveys.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22356548
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 788; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DATA ANALYSIS; DETECTION; DISTRIBUTION; GRAVITATIONAL LENSES; MASS; PLANETS; SATELLITES; SPACE

Citation Formats

Brown, Robert A., E-mail: rbrown@stsci.edu. Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/788/2/192.
Brown, Robert A., E-mail: rbrown@stsci.edu. Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/788/2/192.
Brown, Robert A., E-mail: rbrown@stsci.edu. 2014. "Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/788/2/192.
@article{osti_22356548,
title = {Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys},
author = {Brown, Robert A., E-mail: rbrown@stsci.edu},
abstractNote = {We propose a new approach to discovering faint microlensing signals below traditional thresholds, and for estimating the binary-lens mass ratio and the apparent separation from such signals. The events found will be helpful in accurately estimating the true distribution of planetary semimajor axes, which is an important goal of space microlensing surveys.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/788/2/192},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 788,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 6
}
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