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Title: SU-E-T-244: Motion Control Challenges in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

Abstract

Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy dose distribution is highly localized and has a very sharp fall-off. Thus the one of the most important part of the treatment is the localization and immobilization of the applicator from the implantation to the setup verification to the treatment delivery. The smallest motions of the patient can induce a small rotation, tilt, or translational movement of the applicator that can convert into miss of a significant part of the tumor or to over irradiating a nearby critical organ.The purpose of this study is to revise most of the HDR types of treatments with their applicators and their localization challenges. Since every millimeter of misplacement counts the study will look into the necessity of increasing the immobilization for several types of applicators. Methods: The study took over 136 plans generated by the treatment planning system (TPS) looking into the applicator placement in regard to the organs at risk (OR) and simulated the three possible displacements at the hottest dose point on the critical organ for several accessories to evaluate the variation of the delivered dose at the point due to the displacement. Results: Many of the present immobilization devices produced for external radiotherapy canmore » be used to improve the localization of HDR applicators during transportation of the patient and during treatment. Conclusion: This study data indicates that an improvement of the immobilization devices for HDR is absolutely necessary. Better applicator fixation devices are required too. Developing new immobilization devices for all the applicators is recommended.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL (United States)
  2. South Florida Radiation Oncology and Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL (United States)
  3. University of Bucharest, Bucharest-magurele, Ilfov (Romania)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22351068
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BRACHYTHERAPY; DOSE RATES; NEOPLASMS; ORGANS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Hyvarinen, M, Leventouri, T, Pella, S, and Dumitru, N. SU-E-T-244: Motion Control Challenges in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4888575.
Hyvarinen, M, Leventouri, T, Pella, S, & Dumitru, N. SU-E-T-244: Motion Control Challenges in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4888575.
Hyvarinen, M, Leventouri, T, Pella, S, and Dumitru, N. Sun . "SU-E-T-244: Motion Control Challenges in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4888575.
@article{osti_22351068,
title = {SU-E-T-244: Motion Control Challenges in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy},
author = {Hyvarinen, M and Leventouri, T and Pella, S and Dumitru, N},
abstractNote = {Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy dose distribution is highly localized and has a very sharp fall-off. Thus the one of the most important part of the treatment is the localization and immobilization of the applicator from the implantation to the setup verification to the treatment delivery. The smallest motions of the patient can induce a small rotation, tilt, or translational movement of the applicator that can convert into miss of a significant part of the tumor or to over irradiating a nearby critical organ.The purpose of this study is to revise most of the HDR types of treatments with their applicators and their localization challenges. Since every millimeter of misplacement counts the study will look into the necessity of increasing the immobilization for several types of applicators. Methods: The study took over 136 plans generated by the treatment planning system (TPS) looking into the applicator placement in regard to the organs at risk (OR) and simulated the three possible displacements at the hottest dose point on the critical organ for several accessories to evaluate the variation of the delivered dose at the point due to the displacement. Results: Many of the present immobilization devices produced for external radiotherapy can be used to improve the localization of HDR applicators during transportation of the patient and during treatment. Conclusion: This study data indicates that an improvement of the immobilization devices for HDR is absolutely necessary. Better applicator fixation devices are required too. Developing new immobilization devices for all the applicators is recommended.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4888575},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric accuracy of multiple-diode-array detector (Mapcheck2) for high-dose-rate brachytherapy Ir-192 source. The two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 were validated with EBT2 Gafchromic film measurement and AAPM task-group- 43 (TG-43) modeling. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from Ir-192 source were measured with MapCheck2 and EBT2-films. MapCheck2 response was corrected for effects: directional dependence, diode and phantom heterogeneity. Optical density growth of the film was controlled by synchronized scanning of the film exposed to Ir-192 and calibration films exposed to 6 MV linac beams. Similarly, MapCheck2 response was calibrated to dose using 6 MV beams. An empirical modelmore » was developed for the dose distributions measured with Mapcheck2 that considered directional, diode and phantom heterogeneity corrections. The dose deposited in solid-state-detectors was modeled using a cavity theory model for the diode. This model was then validated with measurements using EBT2-films and calculations with TG-43. Results: The response of MapCheck2 has been corrected for different effects including: (a) directional dependence of 0–20% over angular range 0o–90o, (b) phantom heterogeneity (3%) and (c) diode heterogeneity (9%). The corrected dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 agreed well with the measured dose distributions from EBT2-film and with calculations using TG-43 within 5% over a wide range of dose levels and rates. The advantages of MapCheck2 include less noisy, linear and stable response compared with film. The response of MapCheck2 exposed to 192Ir-source showed no energy dependence similar to its response to MV energy beam. Detection spatial-resolution of individual diodes was 0.8×0.8 mm2, however, 2DMapCheck2 resolution is limited by distance between diodes (7.07 mm). Conclusion: The dose distribution measured with MapCheck2 agreed well within 5% with that measured using EBT2-films; and calculations with TG- 43. Considering correction of artifacts, MapCheck2 provides a compact, practical and accurate dosimetric tool for measurement of 2D-dose distributions for brachytherapy Ir-192.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate whether stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) can mimic the dosimetry of tandem and ovoids/ring brachytherapy. Methods: We selected 5 patients treated with 3D-CT based high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using 4 tandem and ovoid and 1 tandem and ring case. Manual optimization based on the Manchester system followed by graphical optimization (Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan or Varian BrachyVision) was performed to deliver 6.0 Gy per fraction to a high-risk CTV while maintaining dose to organs at risk (OAR) below the ABS recommendations. For theoretical SBRT plans, CT images and OAR contours from the HDRmore » plans were imported into Eclipse (Varian). The SBRT plan was created to mimic the heterogeneity of HDR plans by using a simultaneous integrated boost technique to match the V100, V150, and V200 isodose volumes from HDR. The OAR Dmax from HDR was used to define the OAR dose constraints for SBRT. Target coverage, dose spill-out, and OAR doses (D0.1cc, D1cc, and D2cc) between the HDR and SBRT plans were compared for significance using a two-tail paired ttest. Results: The mean isodose volumes for HDR vs. SBRT were 29.4 cc vs. 29.0 cc (V200, p = 0.674), 49.2 cc vs. 56.3 cc (V150, p = 0.017), 95.4 cc vs. 127.7 cc (V100, p = 0.001), and 271.9 cc vs. 581.6 cc (V50, p = 0.001). The D2cc to OAR for HDR vs. SBRT was 71.6% vs. 96.2% (bladder, p = 0.002), 69.2% vs. 101.7% (rectum, p = 0.0003), and 56.9% vs. 68.6% (sigmoid, p = 0.004). Conclusion: SBRT with VMAT can provide similar dose target coverage (V200), but dose spill-out and doses to OAR were statistically significantly higher than HDR. This study clearly demonstrated that brachytherapy can not be substituted with SBRT in gynecologic cervical cancer treatment.« less
  • Purpose: To characterize dose distributions in high-dose-rate(HDR) surface brachytherapy using an Ir-125 source for different geometries, field sizes and topology of the clinical targets(CT). To investigate the depth doses at the central axis(CAX), edges of the treatment fields(E), and lateral dose distributions(L) present when using flap applicators in skin cancer treatments. Methods: When malignancies diagnosed on the skin are treated, various geometries of the CT require proper adaptation of the flap or custom-made applicators to the treatment site. Consequently, the dose at the depth on CAX and field edges changes with variation of the curvatures and size of the applicators.more » To assess the dose distributions, we created a total of 10 treatment plans(TP) for 10×10 and 20×20 field sizes(FS) with a step size of 1cm. The geometry of the applicators was: planar(PA), curved to 30(CA30) and 60(CA60) degrees with respect to the CAX, half-cylinder(HC), and cylindrical shape(CS). One additional TP was created in which the applicators were positioned to form a dome shape(DS) with a diameter of 16cm. This TP was used to emulate treatment of the average sized scalp. All TPs were optimized to deliver a prescription dose at 8mm equidistantly from the planes containing the dwell positions. This optimization is equivalent to the clinical arrangement since the SSD for the flap applicators is 5mm and the prescription depth is 3mm in the majority of clinical cases. Results: The depths (in mm) of the isodose lines were: FS(10×10):PA[90%(9.1CAX,8.0E,7.6L),50%(28.3CAX,20E,17.3L), 25%(51.1CAX,40E,27L)],CA30[90%(10.3CAX,8.2E,7.9L),50%(32.1CAX, 16.2E,15.8L),25%(61.3CAX,36.7E,31.8L)],CA60[90%(12.2CAX,6.1E,6.3L ),50%(47CAX,14E,16.6L),25%(70.8CAX,31.9E,35.4L)],HC[90%(11.1CA X,6.3E,7.3L),50%(38.3CAX,14.6E,16.1L),25%(66.2CAX,33.8E,34.2L)];FS (20×20):PA[90%(11.1CAX,9.0E,7.0L),50%(34.4CAX,21.9E,15.3L),25%(7 0.4CAX,50.9E,34.8L)],CA30[90%(10.9CAX,7.5E,7.1L),50%(38.8CAX,16. 7E,15.4L),25%(80.7CAX,39.9E,35.7L)],HC[90%(11.1CAX,10.9E,10.6L),5 0%(34.4CAX,38.8E,47.2L),25%(70.4CAX,80.7E,96.6L);DS[90%(12.1CA X,8.5E,6.8L),50%(60.6CAX,17.7E,15.8L),25%(109.6CAX,40.3E,34.3L)]. Conclusion: These results can be used for the approximate calculation and quick assessment of the radiation dose to the organs-at-risk at depth (heart,brain,thyroid, optical nerve) or at the surface distance from the CT (breast,eyes, gonads), and only the geometry of the CT needs to be measured. Understanding of the dose distributions in HDR surface brachytherapy may improve clinical decision making process.« less
  • Purpose: Acuros BV has become available to perform accurate dose calculations in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with phantom heterogeneity considered by solving the Boltzmann transport equation. In this work, we performed validation studies regarding the dose calculation accuracy of Acuros BV in cases with a shielded cylinder applicator using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Fifteen cases were considered in our studies, covering five different diameters of the applicator and three different shielding degrees. For each case, a digital phantom was created in Varian BrachyVision with the cylinder applicator inserted in the middle of a large water phantom. A treatment plan withmore » eight dwell positions was generated for these fifteen cases. Dose calculations were performed with Acuros BV. We then generated a voxelized phantom of the same geometry, and the materials were modeled according to the vendor’s specifications. MC dose calculations were then performed using our in-house developed fast MC dose engine for HDR brachytherapy (gBMC) on a GPU platform, which is able to simulate both photon transport and electron transport in a voxelized geometry. A phase-space file for the Ir-192 HDR source was used as a source model for MC simulations. Results: Satisfactory agreements between the dose distributions calculated by Acuros BV and those calculated by gBMC were observed in all cases. Quantitatively, we computed point-wise dose difference within the region that receives a dose higher than 10% of the reference dose, defined to be the dose at 5mm outward away from the applicator surface. The mean dose difference was ∼0.45%–0.51% and the 95-percentile maximum difference was ∼1.24%–1.47%. Conclusion: Acuros BV is able to accurately perform dose calculations in HDR brachytherapy with a shielded cylinder applicator.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of cylinder size in high dose rate Brachytherapy for primary vaginal cancers. Methods: Patients treated with HDR vaginal vault radiation in a list of cylinders ranging from 2.5 to 4 cm in diameter at 0.5 cm increment were analyzed. All patients’ doses were prescribed at the 0.5 cm from the vaginal surface with different treatment lengths. A series of reference points were created to optimize the dose distribution. The fraction dose was 5.5 Gy, the treatment was repeated for 4 times in two weeks. A cylinder volume was contoured in each case according tomore » the prescribed treatment length, and then expanded to 5 mm to get a volume Cylinder-5mm-exp. A volume of PTV-Eval was obtained by subtracting the cylinder volume from the Cylinder-5mm-exp. The shell volume, PTV-Eval serves as the target volume for dosimetric evaluation. Results: DVH curves and average doses of PTV-Eval were obtained. Our results indicated that the DVH curves shifted toward higher dose side when larger cylinder was used instead of smaller ones. When 3.0 cm cylinder was used instead of 2.5 cm, for 3.0 cm treatment length, the average dose only increased 1%, from 790 to 799 cGy. However, the average doses for 3.5 and 4 cm cylinders respectively are 932 and 1137 cGy at the same treatment length. For 5.0 cm treatment length, the average dose is 741 cGy for 2.5 cm cylinder, and 859 cGy for 3 cm cylinder. Conclusion: Our data analysis suggests that for the vaginal intracavitary HDRBT, the average dose is at least 35% larger than the prescribed dose in the studied cases; the size of the cylinder will impact the dose delivered to the target volume. The cylinder with bigger diameter tends to deliver larger average dose to the PTV-Eval.« less