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Title: Extreme optical confinement in a slotted photonic crystal waveguide

Abstract

Using Optical Coherence Tomography, we measure the attenuation of slow light modes in slotted photonic crystal waveguides. When the group index is close to 20, the attenuation is below 300 dB cm{sup −1}. Here, the optical confinement in the empty slot is very strong, corresponding to an ultra-small effective cross section of 0.02 μm{sup 2}. This is nearly 10 times below the diffraction limit at λ = 1.5 μm, and it enables an effective interaction with a very small volume of functionalized matter.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Institut d'Électronique Fondamentale, Université Paris-Sud CNRS UMR 8622 Bat. 220, Centre scientifique d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France)
  2. Thales Research and Technology, 1 Av. Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22350741
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ATTENUATION; CONFINEMENT; CROSS SECTIONS; CRYSTALS; DIFFRACTION; INTERACTIONS; TOMOGRAPHY; VISIBLE RADIATION; WAVEGUIDES

Citation Formats

Caër, Charles, Le Roux, Xavier, Cassan, Eric, E-mail: eric.cassan@u-psud.fr, Combrié, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.combrie@thalesgroup.com, and De Rossi, Alfredo. Extreme optical confinement in a slotted photonic crystal waveguide. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4896413.
Caër, Charles, Le Roux, Xavier, Cassan, Eric, E-mail: eric.cassan@u-psud.fr, Combrié, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.combrie@thalesgroup.com, & De Rossi, Alfredo. Extreme optical confinement in a slotted photonic crystal waveguide. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4896413.
Caër, Charles, Le Roux, Xavier, Cassan, Eric, E-mail: eric.cassan@u-psud.fr, Combrié, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.combrie@thalesgroup.com, and De Rossi, Alfredo. Mon . "Extreme optical confinement in a slotted photonic crystal waveguide". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4896413.
@article{osti_22350741,
title = {Extreme optical confinement in a slotted photonic crystal waveguide},
author = {Caër, Charles and Le Roux, Xavier and Cassan, Eric, E-mail: eric.cassan@u-psud.fr and Combrié, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.combrie@thalesgroup.com and De Rossi, Alfredo},
abstractNote = {Using Optical Coherence Tomography, we measure the attenuation of slow light modes in slotted photonic crystal waveguides. When the group index is close to 20, the attenuation is below 300 dB cm{sup −1}. Here, the optical confinement in the empty slot is very strong, corresponding to an ultra-small effective cross section of 0.02 μm{sup 2}. This is nearly 10 times below the diffraction limit at λ = 1.5 μm, and it enables an effective interaction with a very small volume of functionalized matter.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4896413},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 12,
volume = 105,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 22 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 22 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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