skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: NO{sub 2} gas sensing of flame-made Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} thick films

Abstract

Unloaded WO{sub 3} and 0.25–1.0 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles for NO{sub 2} gas detection were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) and characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The BET surface area (SSA{sub BET}) of the nanoparticles was measured by nitrogen adsorption. The NO{sub 2} sensing properties of the sensors based on unloaded and Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were investigated. The results showed that the gas sensing properties of the Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensors were excellent to those of the unloaded one. Especially, 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensor showed highest response to NO{sub 2} than the others at low operating temperature of 150 °C. - Graphical abstract: The response of 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO3 sensor was 637 towards NO{sub 2} concentration of 10 ppm at 150 °C. - Highlights: • Unloaded and Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles for NO{sub 2} gas detection were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). • Gas sensing properties of the Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensors were excellent to those of the unloaded one. • 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensor showed highest response to NO{sub 2} at low operating temperature of 150 °C.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Program, Faculty of Graduate School, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)
  2. Program in Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand)
  3. Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)
  4. Nanoelectronics and MEMS Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)
  5. Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22334243
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Solid State Chemistry; Journal Volume: 214; Conference: 7. international conference on materials for advanced technologies, Singapore (Singapore), 30 Jun - 5 Jul 2013; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; ADSORPTION; DETECTION; FILMS; NANOPARTICLES; NITROGEN DIOXIDE; PYROLYSIS; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SENSORS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; TUNGSTATES; TUNGSTEN OXIDES; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Samerjai, Thanittha, Tamaekong, Nittaya, Liewhiran, Chaikarn, Wisitsoraat, Anurat, and Phanichphant, Sukon, E-mail: sphanichphant@yahoo.com. NO{sub 2} gas sensing of flame-made Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} thick films. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.JSSC.2013.10.041.
Samerjai, Thanittha, Tamaekong, Nittaya, Liewhiran, Chaikarn, Wisitsoraat, Anurat, & Phanichphant, Sukon, E-mail: sphanichphant@yahoo.com. NO{sub 2} gas sensing of flame-made Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} thick films. United States. doi:10.1016/J.JSSC.2013.10.041.
Samerjai, Thanittha, Tamaekong, Nittaya, Liewhiran, Chaikarn, Wisitsoraat, Anurat, and Phanichphant, Sukon, E-mail: sphanichphant@yahoo.com. Sun . "NO{sub 2} gas sensing of flame-made Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} thick films". United States. doi:10.1016/J.JSSC.2013.10.041.
@article{osti_22334243,
title = {NO{sub 2} gas sensing of flame-made Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} thick films},
author = {Samerjai, Thanittha and Tamaekong, Nittaya and Liewhiran, Chaikarn and Wisitsoraat, Anurat and Phanichphant, Sukon, E-mail: sphanichphant@yahoo.com},
abstractNote = {Unloaded WO{sub 3} and 0.25–1.0 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles for NO{sub 2} gas detection were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) and characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The BET surface area (SSA{sub BET}) of the nanoparticles was measured by nitrogen adsorption. The NO{sub 2} sensing properties of the sensors based on unloaded and Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were investigated. The results showed that the gas sensing properties of the Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensors were excellent to those of the unloaded one. Especially, 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensor showed highest response to NO{sub 2} than the others at low operating temperature of 150 °C. - Graphical abstract: The response of 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO3 sensor was 637 towards NO{sub 2} concentration of 10 ppm at 150 °C. - Highlights: • Unloaded and Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles for NO{sub 2} gas detection were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). • Gas sensing properties of the Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensors were excellent to those of the unloaded one. • 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensor showed highest response to NO{sub 2} at low operating temperature of 150 °C.},
doi = {10.1016/J.JSSC.2013.10.041},
journal = {Journal of Solid State Chemistry},
number = ,
volume = 214,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • The synthesis of high-temperature superconducting oxides using solution chemistry has been investigated and physical properties are compared to ceramics obtained by conventional solid-state reactions. We report on controlled precipitation and sol-gel processes, both of which produce materials with particle sizes smaller than 5 ..mu..m. We find that the superconducting properties of the high T/sub c/ ceramics are affected by their manner of preparation, such that the transitions are slightly lower in temperature, but sharper, for samples made by solution rather than solid-state chemistry. The ability to prepare stable viscous gels provides an opportunity for obtaining large areas of superconducting coatings.more » For thick films on alumina or silicon substrates, contamination from the substrate is shown to be a problem. Finally, we observe that the sol-gel process lowers the synthesis temperature by 100 /sup 0/C.ing,« less
  • In this study, monoclinic WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were obtained by thermal decomposition of (NH{sub 4}){sub x}WO{sub 3} in air at 600 °C. On them by atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO{sub 2} films were deposited, and thus core/shell WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites were prepared. We prepared composites of WO{sub 3} nanoparticles with conductive polymer as PEDOT:PSS, and deposited thin films of them on glass and ITO substrates by spin coating. The formation, morphology, composition and structure of the as-prepared pure and composite nanoparticles, as well thin films, were studied by TEM, SEM-EDX and XRD. The photocatalytic activity of both the WO{submore » 3} and core/shell WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was studied by decomposing methyl orange in aqueous solution under UV light irradiation. Cyclic voltammetry measurements were performed on the composite PEDOT:PSS/WO{sub 3} thin films, and the coloring and bleaching states were studied.« less
  • Graphical abstract: Generally, large acid quantity and high temperature are beneficial to the formation of anhydrous WO3, but the acidity effect on the crystal phase is weaker than that of temperature. Large acid quantity is found helpful to the oriented growth of tungsten oxides, forming a nanoplate-like product. - Highlights: • Large acid quantity is propitious to the oriented growth of a WO{sub 3} nanoplate. • Effect of acid quantity on crystal phases of products is weaker than that of temperature. • One step hydrothermal synthesis of WO{sub 3} is facile and can be easily scaled up. • A WO{submore » 3} nanoplate shows a fast response and distinct sensing selectivity to acetone gas. - Abstract: WO{sub 3} nanostructures were successfully synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method using Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O and HNO{sub 3} as raw materials. They are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The specific surface area was obtained from N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherm. The effects of the amount of HNO{sub 3}, hydrothermal temperature and reaction time on the crystal phases and morphologies of the WO{sub 3} nanostructures were investigated in detail, and the reaction mechanism was discussed. Large amount of acid is found for the first time to be helpful to the oriented growth of tungsten oxides, forming nanoplate-like products, while hydrothermal temperature has more influence on the crystal phase of the product. Gas-sensing properties of the series of as-prepared WO{sub 3} nanoplates were tested by means of acetone, ethanol, formaldehyde and ammonia. One of the WO{sub 3} nanoplates with high specific surface area and high crystallinity displays high sensitivity, fast response and distinct sensing selectivity to acetone gas.« less
  • Electrochromic behavior has been studied by potentiostatic and galvanostatic measurements on sputtered amorphous films in the systems Li/sub 2/O-WO/sub 3/Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and WO/sub 3/-Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/. The bleaching of films containing Li/sub 2/O was complete, whereas the films without Li/sub 2/O showed a residual color. The kinetics of bleaching in the Li/sub 2/O-WO/sub 3/-Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/ films was ascribed to a space-charge-limited current flow, while that of WO/sub 3/-Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/ films could not be explained by a space-charge-limited current model. Such a difference in electrochromic properties is caused by the addition of Li/sub 2/O, which increases the conductivitymore » of Li/sup +/ ions in the films.« less
  • The reaction of Ru[sub 4]Pt[sub 2](CO)[sub 18] with Ru[sub 4](CO)[sub 13]([mu]-H)[sub 2] at 97[degrees]C yielded the new decanuclear platinum-ruthenium carbonyl cluster complex Ru[sub 8]Pt[sub 2](CO)[sub 23]([mu][sub 3]-H)[sub 2] 1 (22%). In a similar manner the reaction of Ru[sub 4]Pt[sub 2](CO)[sub 18] with Ru[sub 3]Pt(CO)[sub 10](COD)([mu]-H)[sub 2], 2, in 25% yield. Both compounds were characterized by IR, [sup 1]H NMR, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, and both were bound to consist of similar edge-fused bioctahedral clusters with platinum atoms along the edge-sharing sites. There are strong metal-metal bonds between the apices of the adjacent octahedra. Both compounds are electron deficient, andmore » one of the apical-apical Ru-Ru bonds is unusually short, 2.580 (2) [Angstrom] in 1 and 2.593 (5) [Angstrom] in 2. The hydrides are triply bridging ligands, and these were located and refined crystallographically in 1. The reaction of 1 with 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane, dppe, yielded the adduct Ru[sub 8]Pt[sub 2](CO)[sub 21]([mu][sub 3]-CO)[sub 2](dppe)([mu]-H)[sub 2], 3, in 12% yield, which was shown to consist of a face-shared bioctahedral cluster of seven ruthenium and two platinum atoms with a ruthenium spike containing the dppe ligand extending from one triruthenium face. Two novel dihapto-triply bridging carbonyl ligands were found to bridge to the ruthenium spike. 1 and 2 both react with CO at 25[degrees]C, but only the product obtained from the reaction of 2, Ru[sub 6]Pt[sub 3](CO)[sub 21]([mu]-CO)([mu][sub 3]-H)[sub 2], 4, (55% yields), could be fully characterized. It was shown to contain a cluster of nine metal atoms arranged into trinuclear layers of pure ruthenium and pure platinum. The two triply bridging hydride ligands were located and refined crystallographically. 23 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs.« less