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Title: SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

Abstract

Purpose: We aimed to investigate the importance of 4DCT for lung tumors treated with SBRT and whether maximum intensity projection (MIP) and free breathing (FB) images can compansate for tumor movement. Methods: Six patients with primary lung cancer and 2 patients with lung metastasis with a median age of 69.5 (42–86) were included. Patients were positioned supine on a vacuum bag. In addition to FB planning CT images, 4DCT images were obtained at 3 mm intervals using Varian RPM system with (Siemens Somatom Sensetion 64). MIP series were reconstructed using 4DCT images. PTV-FB and PTV-MIP (GTV+5mm) volumes were contoured using FB and MIP series, respectively. GTVs were defined on each of eight different breathing phase images and were merged to create the ITV. PTV-4D was generated with a 5 mm margin to ITV. PTV-MIP and PTV-4D contours were copied to FB CT series and treatment plans for PTV-MIP and PTV-FB were generated using RapidArc (2 partial arc) technique in Eclipse (version 11, AAA algorithm). The prescription dose was 5600cGy in 7 fractions. ITV volumes receiving prescription dose (%) and V95 for ITV were calculated for each treatment plan. Results: The mean PTV-4B, PTV-MIP and PTV-FB volumes were 23.2 cc, 15.4ccmore » ve 11cc respectively. Median volume of ITV receiving the prescription dose was 34.6% (16.4–70 %) and median V95 dose for ITV was 1699cGy (232cGy-5117cGy) in the plan optimized for PTV-FB as the reference. When the plan was optimized for PTV-MIP, median ITV volume receiving the prescription dose was 67.15% (26–86%) and median V95 dose for ITV was 4231cGy (1735cGy-5290cGy). Conclusion: Images used in lung SBRT are critical for treatment quality; FB and MIP images did not compensate target movement, therefore 4DCT images should be obtained for all patients undergoing lung SBRT or the safety margins should be adjusted.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Acibadem Kozyatgi Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)
  2. Acibadem University, Istanbul (Turkey)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22325303
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; CAT SCANNING; DOSES; IMAGES; LUNGS; METASTASES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIOTHERAPY; RESPIRATION; SAFETY MARGINS

Citation Formats

Goksel, E, Cone, D, Kucucuk, H, Senkesen, O, Yilmaz, M, Aslay, I, Tezcanli, E, Garipagaoglu, M, and Sengoz, M. SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4888127.
Goksel, E, Cone, D, Kucucuk, H, Senkesen, O, Yilmaz, M, Aslay, I, Tezcanli, E, Garipagaoglu, M, & Sengoz, M. SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4888127.
Goksel, E, Cone, D, Kucucuk, H, Senkesen, O, Yilmaz, M, Aslay, I, Tezcanli, E, Garipagaoglu, M, and Sengoz, M. 2014. "SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4888127.
@article{osti_22325303,
title = {SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy},
author = {Goksel, E and Cone, D and Kucucuk, H and Senkesen, O and Yilmaz, M and Aslay, I and Tezcanli, E and Garipagaoglu, M and Sengoz, M},
abstractNote = {Purpose: We aimed to investigate the importance of 4DCT for lung tumors treated with SBRT and whether maximum intensity projection (MIP) and free breathing (FB) images can compansate for tumor movement. Methods: Six patients with primary lung cancer and 2 patients with lung metastasis with a median age of 69.5 (42–86) were included. Patients were positioned supine on a vacuum bag. In addition to FB planning CT images, 4DCT images were obtained at 3 mm intervals using Varian RPM system with (Siemens Somatom Sensetion 64). MIP series were reconstructed using 4DCT images. PTV-FB and PTV-MIP (GTV+5mm) volumes were contoured using FB and MIP series, respectively. GTVs were defined on each of eight different breathing phase images and were merged to create the ITV. PTV-4D was generated with a 5 mm margin to ITV. PTV-MIP and PTV-4D contours were copied to FB CT series and treatment plans for PTV-MIP and PTV-FB were generated using RapidArc (2 partial arc) technique in Eclipse (version 11, AAA algorithm). The prescription dose was 5600cGy in 7 fractions. ITV volumes receiving prescription dose (%) and V95 for ITV were calculated for each treatment plan. Results: The mean PTV-4B, PTV-MIP and PTV-FB volumes were 23.2 cc, 15.4cc ve 11cc respectively. Median volume of ITV receiving the prescription dose was 34.6% (16.4–70 %) and median V95 dose for ITV was 1699cGy (232cGy-5117cGy) in the plan optimized for PTV-FB as the reference. When the plan was optimized for PTV-MIP, median ITV volume receiving the prescription dose was 67.15% (26–86%) and median V95 dose for ITV was 4231cGy (1735cGy-5290cGy). Conclusion: Images used in lung SBRT are critical for treatment quality; FB and MIP images did not compensate target movement, therefore 4DCT images should be obtained for all patients undergoing lung SBRT or the safety margins should be adjusted.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4888127},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the influence of {sup 68}-Ga-labeled DOTA ( )-D-Phe ({sup 1})-Tyr ({sup 3})-Octreotide positron emission tomography ([{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET) for target definition for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) as a complementary modality to computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, somatostatin analogs such as DOTATOC offer the possibility of receptor-targeted imaging. Patients and Methods: Twenty-six patients received stereotactic CT, MRI, and [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET as part of their treatment planning. Histology was: World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 1 61.5%, WHO Grade 2 7.7%, WHO Grade 3 3.9%, and undeterminedmore » 26.9%. Six patients received radiotherapy as primary treatment, 2 after subtotal resection; 17 patients were treated for recurrent disease. Dynamic PET scans were acquired before radiotherapy over 60 min after intravenous injection of 156 {+-} 29 MBq [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC. These PET images were imported in the planning software for FSRT. Planning target volume (PTV)-I outlined on CT and contrast-enhanced MRI was compared with PTV-II outlined on PET. PTV-III was defined with CT, MRI, and PET and was actually used for radiotherapy treatment. Results: PTV-III was smaller than PTV-I in 9 patients, the same size in 7 patients, and larger in 10 patients. Median PTV-I was 49.6 cc, median PTV-III was 57.2 cc. In all patients [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET delivered additional information concerning tumor extension. PTV-III was significantly modified based on DOTATOC-PET data in 19 patients. In 1 patient no tumor was exactly identified on CT/MRI but was visible on PET. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET improves target definition for FSRT in patients with intracranial meningiomas. Radiation targeting with fused DOTATOC-PET, CT, and MRI resulted in significant alterations in target definition in 73%.« less
  • Purpose: High local control rates have been reported with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. Because high-dose fractions are used, reduction in treatment portals will reduce the risk of toxicity to adjacent structures. Respiratory gating can allow reduced field sizes and planning four-dimensional computed tomography scans were retrospectively analyzed to study the benefits for gated SRT and identify patients who derive significant benefit from this approach. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 consecutive patients underwent a four-dimensional computed tomography scan, in which three-dimensional computed tomography datasets for 10 phase bins of the respiratory cycle were acquiredmore » during free breathing. For a total of 34 tumors, the three planning target volumes (PTVs) were analyzed, namely (1) PTV{sub 10bins}, derived from an internal target volume (ITV) that incorporated all observed mobility (ITV{sub 10bins}), with the addition of a 3-mm isotropic setup margin; (2) PTV{sub gating}, derived from an ITV generated from mobility observed in three consecutive phases ('bins') during tidal-expiration, plus addition of a 3-mm isotropic margin; and (3) PTV{sub 10mm}, derived from the addition of a 10-mm isotropic margin to the most central gross tumor volumes in the three bins selected for gating. Results: The PTV{sub 10bins} and PTV{sub gating} were, on average, 48.2% and 33.3% of the PTV{sub 10mm}, and respective mean volumes of normal tissue (outside the PTV) receiving the prescribed doses were 57.1% and 39.1%, respectively, of that of PTV{sub 10mm}. A significant correlation was seen between the extent of tumor mobility (i.e., a three-dimensional mobility vector of at least 1 cm) and reduction in normal tissue irradiation achieved with gating. The ratio of the intersecting and the encompassing volumes of GTVs at extreme phases of tidal respiration predicted for the benefits of gated respiration. Conclusion: The use of 'standard population-based' margins for SRT leads to unnecessary normal tissue irradiation. The risk of toxicity is further reduced if respiration-gated radiotherapy is used to treat mobile tumors. These findings suggest that gated SRT will be of clinical relevance in selected patients with mobile tumors.« less
  • This study evaluates the dosimetric impact of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) target volumes and heterogeneity correction (HC) on target coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) doses, and dose conformity in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Twelve patients with lung cancer, scanned using both helical CT and 4DCT, were treated with SBRT (60 Gy in 3 fractions). The clinical plans were calculated without HC and based on targets from the free-breathing helical CT scan (PTV{sub HEL}). Retrospectively, the clinical plans were recalculated with HC and were evaluated based on targets from 4DCT datasets (PTV{sub 4D}) accounting for patient-specific target motion. The PTV{sub 4D}more » was greater than PTV{sub HEL} when tumor motion exceeded 7.5 mm (vector). There were significant decreases in target coverage (V100) for the recalculated vs. clinical plans (0.84 vs. 0.94, p < 0.02) for the same monitor units. When the recalculated plans were optimized for equivalent V100 of the clinical plans, there were significant increases in the 60-Gy dose spillage (1.27 vs. 1.13, p < 0.001) and 30-Gy dose spillage (5.20 vs. 3.73, p < 0.001) vs. the clinical plans. There was a significant increase (p < 0.04) in the mean OAR doses between the optimized re-calculated and the clinical plan. Tumor motion is an important consideration for target volumes defined using helical CT. Lower prescription doses may be required when prospectively planning with HC to achieve a similar level of toxicity and dose spillage as expected when planning based on homogeneous dose calculations.« less
  • Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with Stages 1A and 1B non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with curative intent between Dec 2001 and May 2007. All patients had histopathologically or cytologically confirmed disease, increased levels of tumor markers, and/or positive findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Staging studies identified their disease as Stage 1A or 1B. Performance status was 2 or less according to World Health Organization guidelines in all cases. The prescribed dose of 50 Gy total in fivemore » fractions, calculated by using a superposition algorithm, was defined for the periphery of the planning target volume. Results: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent SBRT during the study period, and 63 were eligible for this analysis. Thirty-eight patients had Stage 1A (T1N0M0) and 25 had Stage 1B (T2N0M0). Forty-nine patients were not appropriate candidates for surgery because of chronic pulmonary disease. Median follow-up of these 49 patients was 31 months (range, 10-72 months). The 3-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates in patients with Stages 1A and 1B were 93% and 96% (p = 0.86), 76% and 77% (p = 0.83), and 90% and 63% (p = 0.09), respectively. No acute toxicity was observed. Grade 2 or higher radiation pneumonitis was experienced by 3 patients, and 1 of them had fatal bacterial pneumonia. Conclusions: The SBRT at 50 Gy total in five fractions to the periphery of the planning target volume calculated by using a superposition algorithm is feasible. High local control rates were achieved for both T2 and T1 tumors.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate whether the three-dimensional cone-beam CT (CBCT) is clinically equivalent to the four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructed images for internal target volume (ITV) localization in image-guided lung stereotactic radiotherapy.Methods: A ball-shaped polystyrene phantom with built-in cube, sphere, and cone of known volumes was attached to a motor-driven platform, which simulates a sinusoidal movement with changeable motion amplitude and frequency. Target motion was simulated in the patient in a superior-inferior (S-I) direction with three motion periods and 2 cm peak-to-peak amplitudes. The Varian onboard Exact-Arms kV CBCT system and the GE LightSpeed four-slice CT integratedmore » with the respiratory-position-management 4DCT scanner were used to scan the moving phantom. MIP images were generated from the 4DCT images. The clinical equivalence of the two sets of images was evaluated by comparing the extreme locations of the moving objects along the motion direction, the centroid position of the ITV, and the ITV volumes that were contoured automatically by Velocity or calculated with an imaging gradient method. The authors compared the ITV volumes determined by the above methods with those theoretically predicted by taking into account the physical object dimensions and the motion amplitudes. The extreme locations were determined by the gradient method along the S-I axis through the center of the object. The centroid positions were determined by autocenter functions. The effect of motion period on the volume sizes was also studied.Results: It was found that the extreme locations of the objects determined from the two image modalities agreed with each other satisfactorily. They were not affected by the motion period. The average difference between the two modalities in the extreme locations was 0.68% for the cube, 1.35% for the sphere, and 0.5% for the cone, respectively. The maximum difference in the centroid position of the cylinder, sphere, and cone was less than 1.4 mm between the two modalities for all motion periods studied. For the ITV volume evaluation, the authors found that both MIP-based and CBCT-based ITVs increased with increases of motion period. Furthermore, the MIP-based ITV volumes were generally larger than those determined from the CBCT images, with the difference in autocontoured volumes being 2.57%, 1.66%, and 1.82% for the sphere, cylinder, and cone, respectively, while these differences increased to 9.57%, 3.52%, 8.71% for the above objects when the gradient method was used. The authors found that the autocontour method was accurate enough to predict the actual ITV values with the absolute differences less than 2.4% comparing to the theoretically predicted values.Conclusions: The extreme location and the centroid position of the objects agree with each other between the two image modalities when the breathing motion is sinusoidal. Although the ITV volumes delineated from both image modalities changed with the motion period, the differences in ITV between the two modalities were minimal when an optimized window level was used. The authors’ results suggest that CBCT and MIP images are equivalent in determining an ITV's position in the conditions studied. The CBCT is adequate in providing imaging-guidance for lung cancer treatment.« less