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Title: A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

Abstract

The construction of a newly designed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell for ultra-dry in situ and operando operation is reported. The reaction cell itself as well as the sample holder is fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high-temperature zone. Special emphasis was put on chemically absolute water-free and inert experimental conditions, which includes reaction cell and gas-feeding lines. Operation and spectroscopy up to 1273 K is possible, as well as pressures up to ambient conditions. The reaction cell exhibits a very easy and variable construction and can be adjusted to any available FT-IR spectrometer. Its particular strength lies in its possibility to access and study samples under very demanding experimental conditions. This includes studies at very high temperatures, e.g., for solid-oxide fuel cell research or studies where the water content of the reaction mixtures must be exactly adjusted. The latter includes all adsorption studies on oxide surfaces, where the hydroxylation degree is of paramount importance. The capability of the reaction cell will be demonstrated for two selected examples where information and in due course a correlation to other methods can only be achieved using the presented setup.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 80-82, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22314662
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ADSORPTION; CERAMICS; FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS; GLASS; HUMIDITY; HYDROXYLATION; INFRARED SPECTRA; OXIDES; PRESSURE RANGE MEGA PA 10-100; QUARTZ; SAMPLE HOLDERS; SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE 1000-4000 K

Citation Formats

Köck, Eva-Maria, Kogler, Michaela, Pramsoler, Reinhold, Klötzer, Bernhard, and Penner, Simon, E-mail: simon.penner@uibk.ac.at. A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4891630.
Köck, Eva-Maria, Kogler, Michaela, Pramsoler, Reinhold, Klötzer, Bernhard, & Penner, Simon, E-mail: simon.penner@uibk.ac.at. A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4891630.
Köck, Eva-Maria, Kogler, Michaela, Pramsoler, Reinhold, Klötzer, Bernhard, and Penner, Simon, E-mail: simon.penner@uibk.ac.at. Fri . "A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4891630.
@article{osti_22314662,
title = {A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy},
author = {Köck, Eva-Maria and Kogler, Michaela and Pramsoler, Reinhold and Klötzer, Bernhard and Penner, Simon, E-mail: simon.penner@uibk.ac.at},
abstractNote = {The construction of a newly designed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell for ultra-dry in situ and operando operation is reported. The reaction cell itself as well as the sample holder is fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high-temperature zone. Special emphasis was put on chemically absolute water-free and inert experimental conditions, which includes reaction cell and gas-feeding lines. Operation and spectroscopy up to 1273 K is possible, as well as pressures up to ambient conditions. The reaction cell exhibits a very easy and variable construction and can be adjusted to any available FT-IR spectrometer. Its particular strength lies in its possibility to access and study samples under very demanding experimental conditions. This includes studies at very high temperatures, e.g., for solid-oxide fuel cell research or studies where the water content of the reaction mixtures must be exactly adjusted. The latter includes all adsorption studies on oxide surfaces, where the hydroxylation degree is of paramount importance. The capability of the reaction cell will be demonstrated for two selected examples where information and in due course a correlation to other methods can only be achieved using the presented setup.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4891630},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 8,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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