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Title: Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

Abstract

Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)
  2. National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)
  3. National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22310701
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 18; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CONFIGURATION; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; CRYSTALS; DIFFRACTION; EPITAXY; FILMS; INCIDENCE ANGLE; INTERFACES; LAYERS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; QUANTUM DOTS; REFLECTION; RESOLUTION; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; STRAINS; SURFACES; SYMMETRY; X RADIATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Huang, Xian-Rong, E-mail: xiahuang@aps.anl.gov, Gog, Thomas, Assoufid, Lahsen, Peng, Ru-Wen, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn, and Siddons, D. P. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4901046.
Huang, Xian-Rong, E-mail: xiahuang@aps.anl.gov, Gog, Thomas, Assoufid, Lahsen, Peng, Ru-Wen, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn, & Siddons, D. P. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4901046.
Huang, Xian-Rong, E-mail: xiahuang@aps.anl.gov, Gog, Thomas, Assoufid, Lahsen, Peng, Ru-Wen, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn, and Siddons, D. P. Mon . "Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4901046.
@article{osti_22310701,
title = {Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle},
author = {Huang, Xian-Rong, E-mail: xiahuang@aps.anl.gov and Gog, Thomas and Assoufid, Lahsen and Peng, Ru-Wen, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn and Siddons, D. P.},
abstractNote = {Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4901046},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 18,
volume = 105,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Nov 03 00:00:00 EST 2014},
month = {Mon Nov 03 00:00:00 EST 2014}
}
  • Cited by 1
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