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Title: A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

Abstract

A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]; ;  [4] more »; « less
  1. Physikdepartment, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)
  2. Jülich Center for Neutron Science, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)
  3. Physics Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)
  4. Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin, D-10587 Berlin (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22308691
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ACCURACY; DESIGN; ELECTRIC DIPOLE MOMENTS; LORENTZ INVARIANCE; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETOMETERS; MEASURING METHODS; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; PRECESSION; SHIELDS; SPIN; STABILIZATION

Citation Formats

Altarev, I., Chesnevskaya, S., Gutsmiedl, E., Kuchler, F., Lins, T., Marino, M., McAndrew, J., Niessen, B., Paul, S., Petzoldt, G., Singh, J., Stoepler, R., Stuiber, S., Sturm, M., Taubenheim, B., Babcock, E., Beck, D., Sharma, S., Burghoff, M., Fan, I., and and others. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4886146.
Altarev, I., Chesnevskaya, S., Gutsmiedl, E., Kuchler, F., Lins, T., Marino, M., McAndrew, J., Niessen, B., Paul, S., Petzoldt, G., Singh, J., Stoepler, R., Stuiber, S., Sturm, M., Taubenheim, B., Babcock, E., Beck, D., Sharma, S., Burghoff, M., Fan, I., & and others. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4886146.
Altarev, I., Chesnevskaya, S., Gutsmiedl, E., Kuchler, F., Lins, T., Marino, M., McAndrew, J., Niessen, B., Paul, S., Petzoldt, G., Singh, J., Stoepler, R., Stuiber, S., Sturm, M., Taubenheim, B., Babcock, E., Beck, D., Sharma, S., Burghoff, M., Fan, I., and and others. Tue . "A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4886146.
@article{osti_22308691,
title = {A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient},
author = {Altarev, I. and Chesnevskaya, S. and Gutsmiedl, E. and Kuchler, F. and Lins, T. and Marino, M. and McAndrew, J. and Niessen, B. and Paul, S. and Petzoldt, G. and Singh, J. and Stoepler, R. and Stuiber, S. and Sturm, M. and Taubenheim, B. and Babcock, E. and Beck, D. and Sharma, S. and Burghoff, M. and Fan, I. and and others},
abstractNote = {A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4886146},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 7,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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