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Title: Comparison of twin-fluid atomizers using a phase Doppler analyser

Abstract

The quality of atomization is crucial in combustion processes, especially in cases of highly viscous fuels. Twin-fluid atomizers have been developed for atomizing heavy and waste fuels and they have undergone significant development in the last decades. Nevertheless, in order to design an atomizer for a given industrial application, a comparison of different atomizers at similar operating conditions is required. This paper focuses on the description and comparison of two internally mixed twin-fluid atomizers at the same operating regime. The Y-jet and the Inverse-effervescent atomizers were examined. The phase-Doppler analyzer was used to measure the velocity and size of droplets in a radial profile in the spray. Data were sorted out into classes with respect to the droplet size and the motion analysis was done for both atomizers.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Brno University of technology, Technická 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22308418
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1608; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 19. international conference on the application of experimental and numerical methods in fluid mechanics and energetics 2014, Liptovsky Jan (Slovakia), 9-11 Apr 2014; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ATOMIZATION; COMBUSTION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DESIGN; DROPLETS; FLUIDS; FUELS; JETS; SPRAYS; VELOCITY; WASTES

Citation Formats

Zaremba, Matouš, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz, Malý, Milan, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz, Jedelský, Jan, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz, and Jícha, Miroslav, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz. Comparison of twin-fluid atomizers using a phase Doppler analyser. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4892748.
Zaremba, Matouš, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz, Malý, Milan, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz, Jedelský, Jan, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz, & Jícha, Miroslav, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz. Comparison of twin-fluid atomizers using a phase Doppler analyser. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4892748.
Zaremba, Matouš, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz, Malý, Milan, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz, Jedelský, Jan, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz, and Jícha, Miroslav, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz. Wed . "Comparison of twin-fluid atomizers using a phase Doppler analyser". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4892748.
@article{osti_22308418,
title = {Comparison of twin-fluid atomizers using a phase Doppler analyser},
author = {Zaremba, Matouš, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz and Malý, Milan, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz and Jedelský, Jan, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz and Jícha, Miroslav, E-mail: y116215@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: y145527@stud.fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jedelsky@fme.vutbr.cz, E-mail: jicha@fme.vutbr.cz},
abstractNote = {The quality of atomization is crucial in combustion processes, especially in cases of highly viscous fuels. Twin-fluid atomizers have been developed for atomizing heavy and waste fuels and they have undergone significant development in the last decades. Nevertheless, in order to design an atomizer for a given industrial application, a comparison of different atomizers at similar operating conditions is required. This paper focuses on the description and comparison of two internally mixed twin-fluid atomizers at the same operating regime. The Y-jet and the Inverse-effervescent atomizers were examined. The phase-Doppler analyzer was used to measure the velocity and size of droplets in a radial profile in the spray. Data were sorted out into classes with respect to the droplet size and the motion analysis was done for both atomizers.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4892748},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1608,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 06 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed Aug 06 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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