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Title: Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue

Abstract

When imaging soft tissues with hard X-rays, phase contrast is often preferred over conventional attenuation contrast due its superior sensitivity. However, it is unclear which of the numerous phase tomography methods yields the optimized results at given experimental conditions. Therefore, we quantitatively compared the three phase tomography methods implemented at the beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: X-ray grating interferometry (XGI), and propagation-based phase tomography, i.e., single-distance phase retrieval (SDPR) and holotomography (HT), using cancerous tissue from a mouse model and an entire heart of a rat. We show that for both specimens, the spatial resolution derived from the characteristic morphological features is about a factor of two better for HT and SDPR compared to XGI, whereas the XGI data generally exhibit much better contrast-to-noise ratios for the anatomical features. Moreover, XGI excels in fidelity of the density measurements, and is also more robust against low-frequency artifacts than HT, but it might suffer from phase-wrapping artifacts. Thus, we can regard the three phase tomography methods discussed as complementary. The application will decide which spatial and density resolutions are desired, for the imaging task and dose requirements, and, in addition, the applicant must choose between the complexity of themore » experimental setup and the one of data processing.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [5];  [3]; ;  [5];  [6];  [7];  [2];  [5];  [3]
  1. Biomaterials Science Center, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland)
  2. Physik-Department und Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)
  3. (France)
  4. (Switzerland)
  5. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)
  6. Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)
  7. Institute of Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22305852
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 116; Journal Issue: 15; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ANIMAL TISSUES; ATTENUATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DATA PROCESSING; EUROPEAN SYNCHROTRON RADIATION FACILITY; HARD X RADIATION; INTERFEROMETRY; NOISE; PLANT TISSUES; RADIATION DOSES; SENSITIVITY; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; TOMOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Lang, S., Schulz, G., Müller, B., Zanette, I., E-mail: irene.zanette@tum.de, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, Dominietto, M., Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Langer, M., Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-LYON, Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbane, Rack, A., Le Duc, G., David, C., Mohr, J., Pfeiffer, F., Weitkamp, T., and Synchrotron Soleil, Gif-sur-Yvette. Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4897225.
Lang, S., Schulz, G., Müller, B., Zanette, I., E-mail: irene.zanette@tum.de, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, Dominietto, M., Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Langer, M., Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-LYON, Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbane, Rack, A., Le Duc, G., David, C., Mohr, J., Pfeiffer, F., Weitkamp, T., & Synchrotron Soleil, Gif-sur-Yvette. Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4897225.
Lang, S., Schulz, G., Müller, B., Zanette, I., E-mail: irene.zanette@tum.de, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, Dominietto, M., Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Langer, M., Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-LYON, Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbane, Rack, A., Le Duc, G., David, C., Mohr, J., Pfeiffer, F., Weitkamp, T., and Synchrotron Soleil, Gif-sur-Yvette. Tue . "Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4897225.
@article{osti_22305852,
title = {Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue},
author = {Lang, S. and Schulz, G. and Müller, B. and Zanette, I., E-mail: irene.zanette@tum.de and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble and Dominietto, M. and Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zürich, Zürich and Langer, M. and Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-LYON, Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbane and Rack, A. and Le Duc, G. and David, C. and Mohr, J. and Pfeiffer, F. and Weitkamp, T. and Synchrotron Soleil, Gif-sur-Yvette},
abstractNote = {When imaging soft tissues with hard X-rays, phase contrast is often preferred over conventional attenuation contrast due its superior sensitivity. However, it is unclear which of the numerous phase tomography methods yields the optimized results at given experimental conditions. Therefore, we quantitatively compared the three phase tomography methods implemented at the beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: X-ray grating interferometry (XGI), and propagation-based phase tomography, i.e., single-distance phase retrieval (SDPR) and holotomography (HT), using cancerous tissue from a mouse model and an entire heart of a rat. We show that for both specimens, the spatial resolution derived from the characteristic morphological features is about a factor of two better for HT and SDPR compared to XGI, whereas the XGI data generally exhibit much better contrast-to-noise ratios for the anatomical features. Moreover, XGI excels in fidelity of the density measurements, and is also more robust against low-frequency artifacts than HT, but it might suffer from phase-wrapping artifacts. Thus, we can regard the three phase tomography methods discussed as complementary. The application will decide which spatial and density resolutions are desired, for the imaging task and dose requirements, and, in addition, the applicant must choose between the complexity of the experimental setup and the one of data processing.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4897225},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 15,
volume = 116,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 21 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Oct 21 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • Many scientific research areas rely on accurate electron density characterization of various materials. For instance in X-ray optics and radiation therapy, there is a need for a fast and reliable technique to quantitatively characterize samples for electron density. We present how a precise measurement of electron density can be performed using an X-ray phase-contrast grating interferometer in a radiographic mode of a homogenous sample in a controlled geometry. A batch of various plastic materials was characterized quantitatively and compared with calculated results. We found that the measured electron densities closely match theoretical values. The technique yields comparable results between amore » monochromatic and a polychromatic X-ray source. Measured electron densities can be further used to design dedicated X-ray phase contrast phantoms and the additional information on small angle scattering should be taken into account in order to exclude unsuitable materials.« less
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