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Title: Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

Abstract

We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Exploratory Integrated Circuits, Components Research, Intel Corp., Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22304254
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 115; Journal Issue: 21; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ACCELERATION; ANISOTROPY; ATTENUATION; CURRENTS; DEMAGNETIZATION; DOMAIN STRUCTURE; MAGNETIZATION; NANOSTRUCTURES; REFLECTION; SIMULATION; SPIN

Citation Formats

Nikonov, Dmitri E., Manipatruni, Sasikanth, and Young, Ian A. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4881061.
Nikonov, Dmitri E., Manipatruni, Sasikanth, & Young, Ian A. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4881061.
Nikonov, Dmitri E., Manipatruni, Sasikanth, and Young, Ian A. 2014. "Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4881061.
@article{osti_22304254,
title = {Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects},
author = {Nikonov, Dmitri E. and Manipatruni, Sasikanth and Young, Ian A.},
abstractNote = {We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4881061},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 21,
volume = 115,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 6
}
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