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Title: Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

Abstract

We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. School of Computer Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22304192
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 115; Journal Issue: 22; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ADIABATIC PROCESSES; EVOLUTION; QUANTUM COMPUTERS; QUANTUM STATES; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Sun, Jie, Lu, Songfeng, E-mail: lusongfeng@hotmail.com, and Liu, Fang. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4882018.
Sun, Jie, Lu, Songfeng, E-mail: lusongfeng@hotmail.com, & Liu, Fang. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4882018.
Sun, Jie, Lu, Songfeng, E-mail: lusongfeng@hotmail.com, and Liu, Fang. Sat . "Adiabatically implementing quantum gates". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4882018.
@article{osti_22304192,
title = {Adiabatically implementing quantum gates},
author = {Sun, Jie and Lu, Songfeng, E-mail: lusongfeng@hotmail.com and Liu, Fang},
abstractNote = {We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4882018},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 22,
volume = 115,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jun 14 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sat Jun 14 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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