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Title: Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435

Abstract

A combination of transient heat transfer analytical solutions for a finite line source, a series of point sources, and a series of parallel infinite line sources were combined with a quasi-steady-state multi-layered cylindrical solution to simulate the temperature response of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository with multi-layered natural and engineered barriers. This evaluation was performed to provide information to scientists and decision makers to compare candidate geologic media for a repository (crystalline rock [granite], clay, salt, and deep borehole), and to provide input for the future evaluation of the trade-off between pre-emplacement surface storage time, waste package size, and repository footprint. This approach was selected in favor of the finite element solution typically used to analyze the temperature response because it allowed rapid comparison of a large number of alternative disposal options and design configurations. More than 100 combinations of waste form, geologic environment, repository design configuration, and surface storage times were analyzed and compared. The analytical solution approach used to analyze the repository temperature response allowed rapid comparison of a large number of alternative disposal options and design configurations. More than 100 combinations of waste form, geologic environment, repository design configuration, and surface storage times were analyzed andmore » compared. This approach allowed investigation of the sensitivity of the results to combinations of parameters that show that there is much flexibility to be gained in terms of spent fuel management options by varying a few key parameters. This initial analysis used representative design concepts and thermal constraints based on international design concepts, and it also included waste forms representing future fuel cycles with high burnup fuels. Unlike repository designs with large open tunnels and pre-closure ventilation, all of the disposal concepts analyzed in this study used enclosed emplacement modes, where the waste packages were in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The deep borehole repository concept limits the size of the SNF waste packages and may require rod consolidation to fit within the drill casing diameter. A single assembly waste package, assuming rod consolidation, was evaluated in the current analysis. Similar size restrictions apply for the HLW canisters. At this time no thermal constraints have been defined for the deep borehole repository concept. Representative EBS materials and properties were evaluated. However, changes in EBS design concepts and materials can also have significant effects on the maximum waste package surface temperature. Increased thermal conductivity of the buffer layer can be achieved by using an engineered buffer consisting of a mixture of graphite, sand, and bentonite [14]. One of the advantages of the analytical model is that it highlights the sensitivity of the results to the parameters that define the repository layout, including spacing between axial and lateral neighboring waste packages and drifts. It is clear that repository layout adjustments can be made to reduce the calculated peak temperatures. The results also show that significant reductions in required surface storage times can be achieved if higher thermal constraints can be justified Additional studies are planned to evaluate the trade-offs between surface storage times, repository layout parameters, and variations in EBS design concepts. Model validation and uncertainties will also be addressed. It is expected that shorter surface storage times and more optimized repository design configurations may be achieved. (authors)« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)
  2. University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9-332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22293666
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-14-WM-12435
TRN: US14V1322115190
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2012: Waste Management 2012 conference on improving the future in waste management, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 26 Feb - 1 Mar 2012; Other Information: Country of input: France; 14 refs.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 42 ENGINEERING; ANALYTICAL SOLUTION; BENTONITE; ENGINEERS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; FLEXIBILITY; FUEL CYCLE; GRAPHITE; HEAT TRANSFER; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SENSITIVITY; SPENT FUELS; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; WASTE FORMS

Citation Formats

Greenberg, Harris R., Blink, James A., Fratoni, Massimiliano, Sutton, Mark, and Ross, Amber D. Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Greenberg, Harris R., Blink, James A., Fratoni, Massimiliano, Sutton, Mark, & Ross, Amber D. Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435. United States.
Greenberg, Harris R., Blink, James A., Fratoni, Massimiliano, Sutton, Mark, and Ross, Amber D. Sun . "Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435". United States.
@article{osti_22293666,
title = {Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435},
author = {Greenberg, Harris R. and Blink, James A. and Fratoni, Massimiliano and Sutton, Mark and Ross, Amber D.},
abstractNote = {A combination of transient heat transfer analytical solutions for a finite line source, a series of point sources, and a series of parallel infinite line sources were combined with a quasi-steady-state multi-layered cylindrical solution to simulate the temperature response of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository with multi-layered natural and engineered barriers. This evaluation was performed to provide information to scientists and decision makers to compare candidate geologic media for a repository (crystalline rock [granite], clay, salt, and deep borehole), and to provide input for the future evaluation of the trade-off between pre-emplacement surface storage time, waste package size, and repository footprint. This approach was selected in favor of the finite element solution typically used to analyze the temperature response because it allowed rapid comparison of a large number of alternative disposal options and design configurations. More than 100 combinations of waste form, geologic environment, repository design configuration, and surface storage times were analyzed and compared. The analytical solution approach used to analyze the repository temperature response allowed rapid comparison of a large number of alternative disposal options and design configurations. More than 100 combinations of waste form, geologic environment, repository design configuration, and surface storage times were analyzed and compared. This approach allowed investigation of the sensitivity of the results to combinations of parameters that show that there is much flexibility to be gained in terms of spent fuel management options by varying a few key parameters. This initial analysis used representative design concepts and thermal constraints based on international design concepts, and it also included waste forms representing future fuel cycles with high burnup fuels. Unlike repository designs with large open tunnels and pre-closure ventilation, all of the disposal concepts analyzed in this study used enclosed emplacement modes, where the waste packages were in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The deep borehole repository concept limits the size of the SNF waste packages and may require rod consolidation to fit within the drill casing diameter. A single assembly waste package, assuming rod consolidation, was evaluated in the current analysis. Similar size restrictions apply for the HLW canisters. At this time no thermal constraints have been defined for the deep borehole repository concept. Representative EBS materials and properties were evaluated. However, changes in EBS design concepts and materials can also have significant effects on the maximum waste package surface temperature. Increased thermal conductivity of the buffer layer can be achieved by using an engineered buffer consisting of a mixture of graphite, sand, and bentonite [14]. One of the advantages of the analytical model is that it highlights the sensitivity of the results to the parameters that define the repository layout, including spacing between axial and lateral neighboring waste packages and drifts. It is clear that repository layout adjustments can be made to reduce the calculated peak temperatures. The results also show that significant reductions in required surface storage times can be achieved if higher thermal constraints can be justified Additional studies are planned to evaluate the trade-offs between surface storage times, repository layout parameters, and variations in EBS design concepts. Model validation and uncertainties will also be addressed. It is expected that shorter surface storage times and more optimized repository design configurations may be achieved. (authors)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22293666}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {7}
}

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