skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins - 12210

Abstract

Organic ion exchangers (IEX) play a major and increasing role in the reactor coolant and other water purification processes. During their operation time they receive significant amounts of radioactivity, making their disposal, together with their organic nature, as medium active waste challenging. Processes applied so far do not eliminate the organic matter, which is unwanted in disposal facilities, or, if high temperatures are applied, raise problems with volatile radionuclides. NUKEM Technologies offers their well introduces process for the destruction of spent solvent (TBP), the pebble bed pyrolysis, now for the treatment of spent IEX (and other problematic waste), with the following benefits: the pyrolysis product is free of organic matter, and the operation temperature with approx. 500 deg. C keeps Cs radionuclides completely in the solid residue. (authors)

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9-332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22293505
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-14-WM-12210
TRN: US14V1160115029
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2012: Waste Management 2012 conference on improving the future in waste management, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 26 Feb - 1 Mar 2012; Other Information: Country of input: France
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; COOLANTS; ION EXCHANGE; OPERATION; ORGANIC ION EXCHANGERS; ORGANIC MATTER; PURIFICATION; PYROLYSIS; PYROLYSIS PRODUCTS; RADIOACTIVITY; RADIOISOTOPES; RESIDUES; RESINS; SOLIDS; SOLVENTS; VOLATILITY; WASTES; WATER

Citation Formats

Braehler, Georg, and Slametschka, Rainer. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins - 12210. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Braehler, Georg, & Slametschka, Rainer. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins - 12210. United States.
Braehler, Georg, and Slametschka, Rainer. 2012. "Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins - 12210". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_22293505,
title = {Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins - 12210},
author = {Braehler, Georg and Slametschka, Rainer},
abstractNote = {Organic ion exchangers (IEX) play a major and increasing role in the reactor coolant and other water purification processes. During their operation time they receive significant amounts of radioactivity, making their disposal, together with their organic nature, as medium active waste challenging. Processes applied so far do not eliminate the organic matter, which is unwanted in disposal facilities, or, if high temperatures are applied, raise problems with volatile radionuclides. NUKEM Technologies offers their well introduces process for the destruction of spent solvent (TBP), the pebble bed pyrolysis, now for the treatment of spent IEX (and other problematic waste), with the following benefits: the pyrolysis product is free of organic matter, and the operation temperature with approx. 500 deg. C keeps Cs radionuclides completely in the solid residue. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 7
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Radioactive ion exchange resins are produced in water cleaning systems in nuclear power plants. Studsvik RadWaste AB and GNS have developed a pyrolysis process for the treatment of resins with the goal of an optimal volume reduction and a transformation of the ion exchange resins into a biological and chemical inert state. The degradation products arising from the pyrolysis are char, tar and gas. In the pyrolysis process used by Studsvik RadWaste and GNS about 1/3 char, 1/3 water and tar and 1/3 gas are produced. The char is supercompacted in order to receive a volume reduction of about 10:1more » and a better product for final storage. Ion exchange resins with a specific {beta}/{gamma} activity of 1E12 Bq/m{sup 3} with 50% of Co-60 can be handled. The retention of the activity has been 0.5E6:1. By processing a total of 100 kg ion exchange resins with a total activity of IE9 Bq only some hundred becquerel have been monitored outside the pyrolyzing unit. This means that the products leaving the pyrolyzing unit, in this case tar, water and gas could be handled as non radioactive material in a conventional waste treatment facility.« less
  • This paper will specifically address the use and life cycle of ion exchange resins as they relate to the SRS Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Basins. This paper also chronicles the use of two types of ion exchange resins and their affect on basin water quality from the sixties until today.
  • Based upon the Transnuclear scandal in 1987, the nuclear power plant Philippsburg started to reflect on new and different technologies to take care of the KKP waste streams and to optimize the waste volumes to be disposed off. This paper especially deals with the waste stream of ion exchange resins. After a detailed evaluation of available technologies on the market, Philippsburg entered into a demonstration period with mobile equipment. This paper will present the results of the mobile campaigns, the subsequent decisions in Philippsburg and the resultant investments for the building and waste treatment equipment. A building layout and amore » flow chart of the resin treatment process will be shown in the presentation.« less
  • Under the Science and Technology Implementing Arrangement for Cooperation on Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management (JCCRM), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is helping to transfer waste treatment technology to international atomic energy commissions. The results obtained thus far show that spent ion exchange resins can be effectively treated using vitrification to immobilize the contained radionuclides. This work is continuing into FY01.
  • Management of spent ion-exchange resin waste arising from nuclear reactor operations by traditional practice of encapsulation in cement is associated with problems such as swelling and disintegration. Complete oxidation (mineralization) is an attractive alternative option. This paper reports the development of photochemical mineralization process for organic ion-exchange resins of poly (styrene-divinyl benzene) type with sulfonic acid and quaternary ammonium functional groups. It is a two-step process consisting of dissolution (conversion of solid resin into water-soluble reaction products) and photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin. Cation and anion resin dissolution was effected by reaction of the resin with H2O2 at 50-60more » C in the presence of ferrous/copper sulphate catalyst. Direct dissolution of mixed resin was not efficient. However, the cation resin portion in the mixed resin could be selectively dissolved without affecting the anion portion. The solid anion resin after separation from the cation resin solution could be dissolved. About 0.5 liters of 50% H2O2 was required for dissolution of one kg of wet resin. The reaction time was 4-5 hours. Dissolution experiments were conducted on up to 8 liters of wet resin. The second step, viz., photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin was effected at ambient temperature(25-35 C). Kinetic results of laboratory scale experiments in immersion type photo-reactor and pilot scale experiments in tubular flow photo-reactor were presented. These results clearly demonstrated the photo-Fenton mineralization of dissolved resin at ambient temperature with stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 as against 70-200% excess H2O2 requirement in chemical mineralization experiments under Fenton oxidation conditions at 90-95 C. Based on these studies, a treatment scheme was developed and presented in this paper.« less