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Title: HLW Return from France to Germany - 15 Years of Experience in Public Acceptance and Technical Aspects - 12149

Abstract

Since in 1984 the national reprocessing concept was abandoned the reprocessing abroad was the only existing disposal route until 1994. With the amendment of the Atomic Energy Act in 2001 spent fuel management changed completely since from 1 June 2005 any delivery of spent fuel to reprocessing plants was prohibited and the direct disposal of spent fuel became mandatory. Until 2005 the total amount of spent fuel to be reprocessed abroad added up to 6080 t HM, 5309 t HM thereof in France. The waste generated from reprocessing - alternatively an equivalent amount of radioactive material - has to be returned to the country of origin according to the commercial contracts signed between the German utilities and COGEMA, now AREVA NC, in France and BNFL, now INS in UK. In addition the German and the French government exchanged notes with the obligation of both sides to enable and support the return of reprocessing residues or equivalents to Germany. The return of high active vitrified waste from La Hague to the interim storage facility at Gorleben was demanding from the technical view i. e. the cask design and the transport. Unfortunately the Gorleben area served as a target for nuclear opponentsmore » from the first transport in 1996 to the latest one in 2011. The protection against sabotage of the railway lines and mass protests needed highly improved security measures. In France and Germany special working forces and projects have been set up to cope with this extraordinary situation. A complex transport organization was established to involve all parties in line with the German and French requirements during transport. The last transport of vitrified residues from France has been completed successfully so far thus confirming the efficiency of the applied measures. Over 15 years there was and still is worldwide no comparable situation it is still unique. Summing up, the exceptional project handling challenge that resulted from the continuous anti-nuclear civil disobedience in Germany over the whole 15-year long project running time could be faced efficiently. It has to be concluded that despite of all problems the anti-nuclear activities have caused so far, all transports of vitrified HLW have always been completed successfully by adapting the commonly established safety, security and public acceptance measures to the special conditions and needs in Germany and coordinating the activities of all parties involved but at the expense of high costs for industry and government and a challenging operational complexity. Apart from an anticipatory project planning a good communication between all involved industrial parties and the French and the German government was the key to the effective management of such shipments and to minimize the radiological, economic, environmental, public and political impact. The future will show how efficiently the gained experience can be used for further return projects which are to be realized since no reprocessed waste has yet been returned from UK and neither the medium-level nor the low-level radioactive waste has been transferred from France to Germany. (author)« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, 45127 Essen (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9-332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22293455
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-14-WM-12149
TRN: US14V1109114979
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2012: Waste Management 2012 conference on improving the future in waste management, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 26 Feb - 1 Mar 2012; Other Information: Country of input: France; 1 refs.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; EFFICIENCY; FUEL REPROCESSING PLANTS; LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; REPROCESSING; SAFETY; SECURITY; SPENT FUELS; WASTE STORAGE

Citation Formats

Graf, Wilhelm. HLW Return from France to Germany - 15 Years of Experience in Public Acceptance and Technical Aspects - 12149. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Graf, Wilhelm. HLW Return from France to Germany - 15 Years of Experience in Public Acceptance and Technical Aspects - 12149. United States.
Graf, Wilhelm. Sun . "HLW Return from France to Germany - 15 Years of Experience in Public Acceptance and Technical Aspects - 12149". United States.
@article{osti_22293455,
title = {HLW Return from France to Germany - 15 Years of Experience in Public Acceptance and Technical Aspects - 12149},
author = {Graf, Wilhelm},
abstractNote = {Since in 1984 the national reprocessing concept was abandoned the reprocessing abroad was the only existing disposal route until 1994. With the amendment of the Atomic Energy Act in 2001 spent fuel management changed completely since from 1 June 2005 any delivery of spent fuel to reprocessing plants was prohibited and the direct disposal of spent fuel became mandatory. Until 2005 the total amount of spent fuel to be reprocessed abroad added up to 6080 t HM, 5309 t HM thereof in France. The waste generated from reprocessing - alternatively an equivalent amount of radioactive material - has to be returned to the country of origin according to the commercial contracts signed between the German utilities and COGEMA, now AREVA NC, in France and BNFL, now INS in UK. In addition the German and the French government exchanged notes with the obligation of both sides to enable and support the return of reprocessing residues or equivalents to Germany. The return of high active vitrified waste from La Hague to the interim storage facility at Gorleben was demanding from the technical view i. e. the cask design and the transport. Unfortunately the Gorleben area served as a target for nuclear opponents from the first transport in 1996 to the latest one in 2011. The protection against sabotage of the railway lines and mass protests needed highly improved security measures. In France and Germany special working forces and projects have been set up to cope with this extraordinary situation. A complex transport organization was established to involve all parties in line with the German and French requirements during transport. The last transport of vitrified residues from France has been completed successfully so far thus confirming the efficiency of the applied measures. Over 15 years there was and still is worldwide no comparable situation it is still unique. Summing up, the exceptional project handling challenge that resulted from the continuous anti-nuclear civil disobedience in Germany over the whole 15-year long project running time could be faced efficiently. It has to be concluded that despite of all problems the anti-nuclear activities have caused so far, all transports of vitrified HLW have always been completed successfully by adapting the commonly established safety, security and public acceptance measures to the special conditions and needs in Germany and coordinating the activities of all parties involved but at the expense of high costs for industry and government and a challenging operational complexity. Apart from an anticipatory project planning a good communication between all involved industrial parties and the French and the German government was the key to the effective management of such shipments and to minimize the radiological, economic, environmental, public and political impact. The future will show how efficiently the gained experience can be used for further return projects which are to be realized since no reprocessed waste has yet been returned from UK and neither the medium-level nor the low-level radioactive waste has been transferred from France to Germany. (author)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {7}
}

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