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Title: Epoxy elastomers reinforced with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stimuli-responsive shape memory materials

Abstract

In this work, the incorporation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into epoxy-based elastomers was carried out in order to obtain nanocomposite systems with shape memory effect. For the preparation of elastomeric matrices, p-bis(2,3-epoxypropoxy)-α-methylstilbene (DOMS) was cured with sebacic acid. DOMS was synthesized in our laboratory and it is characterized by a rigid-rod, potentially liquid crystalline structure. A lightly cross-linked liquid crystalline elastomer was obtained. As for nanocomposites, variable amounts (0.75, 1.50, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0 wt.%) of COOH-MWCNTs were employed. In order to improve the nanotubes dispersibility and the interfacial adhesion with the epoxy matrix, an optimized two-step procedure was developed, which consisted in grafting the epoxy monomer onto the nanotube surface and then curing it in presence of crosslinking agent. DOMS-functionalized MWCNT were characterized through solvent dispersion experiments, FTIR spectroscopy and TGA analysis, which demonstrated the occurred covalent functionalization of the nanotubes with the epoxy monomers. The morphological analysis through electron microscopy demonstrated that this was an efficient strategy to improve the dispersion of nanotubes within the matrix. The second part of the work was devoted to the structural, thermal, mechanical and electric characterization of elastomeric nanocomposites. The results indicated a general improvement of properties of nanocomposites. Also, independently ofmore » the nanotube content, a smectic phase formed. Shape memory features of LC systems were also evaluated. It was demonstrated the shape could be recovered through heating, solvent immersion, as well as upon the application of an electrical field.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Institute of Polymer Chemistry and Technology (ICTP-CNR), via Campi Flegrei 34, 80078 Pozzuoli (Italy)
  2. Department of Chemical, Materials and Production Engineering - University of Naples Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22280332
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1599; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 7. international conference on times of polymers (TOP) and composites, Ischia (Italy), 22-26 Jun 2014; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ADHESION; CARBON NANOTUBES; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; COVALENCE; CROSS-LINKING; ELASTOMERS; ELECTRIC FIELDS; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; EPOXIDES; FOURIER TRANSFORMATION; INFRARED SPECTRA; MATRIX MATERIALS; MONOMERS; SEBACIC ACID; SHAPE MEMORY EFFECT; THERMAL GRAVIMETRIC ANALYSIS; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Lama, G. C., Nasti, G., Cerruti, P., Gentile, G., Carfagna, C., and Ambrogi, V. Epoxy elastomers reinforced with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stimuli-responsive shape memory materials. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4876808.
Lama, G. C., Nasti, G., Cerruti, P., Gentile, G., Carfagna, C., & Ambrogi, V. Epoxy elastomers reinforced with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stimuli-responsive shape memory materials. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4876808.
Lama, G. C., Nasti, G., Cerruti, P., Gentile, G., Carfagna, C., and Ambrogi, V. Thu . "Epoxy elastomers reinforced with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stimuli-responsive shape memory materials". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4876808.
@article{osti_22280332,
title = {Epoxy elastomers reinforced with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stimuli-responsive shape memory materials},
author = {Lama, G. C. and Nasti, G. and Cerruti, P. and Gentile, G. and Carfagna, C. and Ambrogi, V.},
abstractNote = {In this work, the incorporation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into epoxy-based elastomers was carried out in order to obtain nanocomposite systems with shape memory effect. For the preparation of elastomeric matrices, p-bis(2,3-epoxypropoxy)-α-methylstilbene (DOMS) was cured with sebacic acid. DOMS was synthesized in our laboratory and it is characterized by a rigid-rod, potentially liquid crystalline structure. A lightly cross-linked liquid crystalline elastomer was obtained. As for nanocomposites, variable amounts (0.75, 1.50, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0 wt.%) of COOH-MWCNTs were employed. In order to improve the nanotubes dispersibility and the interfacial adhesion with the epoxy matrix, an optimized two-step procedure was developed, which consisted in grafting the epoxy monomer onto the nanotube surface and then curing it in presence of crosslinking agent. DOMS-functionalized MWCNT were characterized through solvent dispersion experiments, FTIR spectroscopy and TGA analysis, which demonstrated the occurred covalent functionalization of the nanotubes with the epoxy monomers. The morphological analysis through electron microscopy demonstrated that this was an efficient strategy to improve the dispersion of nanotubes within the matrix. The second part of the work was devoted to the structural, thermal, mechanical and electric characterization of elastomeric nanocomposites. The results indicated a general improvement of properties of nanocomposites. Also, independently of the nanotube content, a smectic phase formed. Shape memory features of LC systems were also evaluated. It was demonstrated the shape could be recovered through heating, solvent immersion, as well as upon the application of an electrical field.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4876808},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1599,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Thu May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely explored for biomedical applications, but there is very limited information regarding their in vivo biodistribution and biocompatibility. Here, we report the in vivo biodistribution and long-term effects of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in developing zebrafish. The fluorescent-labeled MWCNTs were introduced into zebrafish embryos at 1-cell stage and at 72 h post fertilization through microinjection. After single injection, both acute and long-term interactions between zebrafish and functionalized MWCNTs were studied. The injected FITC-BSA-MWCNTs (at 1-cell stage) were allocated to all blastoderm cells of the embryos through proliferation, and were distinctively excluded from the yolk cell.more » When introduced into the circulation system, FITC-BSA-MWCNTs moved easily in the compartments and finally were cleaned out by the body at 96 h after the loading. At early stages, the treated zebrafish embryos generated immune response by accumulating circulating white blood cells at the trunk region. Under transmission electron microscope, many lysosome-like vesicles were observed in the blastoderm cells of the treated embryos. The zebrafish loaded with MWCNTs had normal primordial germ cells at early stage and produced second generation later on. However, the larvae of the second generation had obviously lower survival rates as compared to the untreated groups, suggesting a negative effect on the reproduction potential. These results suggest that extensive purification and functionalization processes can help improve the biocompatibility of CNTs. This study also indicates that purified CNTs may have long-term toxicity effects when they were delivered into the body.« less
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  • Magnesia tuned alumina ceramic nanocomposites, reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes, were condensed using pressureless and hot-press sintering processes. Densification, microstructure and mechanical properties of the produced nanocomposites were meticulously investigated. Electron microscopy studies revealed the homogenous carbon nanotube dispersion within the alumina matrix and confirmed the retention of carbon nanotubes' distinctive tubular morphology and nanoscale features during the extreme mixing/sintering processes. Pressureless sintered nanocomposites showed meagre mechanical responses due to the poorly-integrated microstructures with a slight improvement upon magnesia addition. Conversely, both the magnesia addition and application of hot-press sintering technique resulted in the nanocomposite formation with near-theoretical densities (~more » 99%), well-integrated microstructures and superior mechanical properties. Hot-press sintered nanocomposites incorporating 300 and 600 ppm magnesia exhibited an increase in hardness (10 and 11%), flexural strength (5 and 10%) and fracture toughness (15 and 20%) with respect to similar magnesia-free samples. Compared to monolithic alumina, a decent rise in fracture toughness (37%), flexural strength (22%) and hardness (20%) was observed in the hot-press sintered nanocomposites tuned with merely 600 ppm magnesia. Mechanically superior hot-press sintered magnesia tailored nanocomposites are attractive for several load-bearing structural applications. - Highlights: • MgO tailored Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–2 wt.% CNT nanocomposites are presented. • The role of MgO and sintering on nanocomposite structures and properties was studied. • Well-dispersed CNTs maintained their morphology/structure after harsh sintering. • Hot-pressing and MgO led nanocomposites to higher properties/unified structures. • MgO tuned composites showed higher toughness (37%) and strength (22%) than Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.« less
  • A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotubemore » surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.« less