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Title: Testing the origin of the CMB large-angle correlation deficit with a galaxy imaging survey

Abstract

The cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature distribution measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) exhibits anomalously low correlation at large angles. Quantifying the degree to which this feature in the temperature data is in conflict with standard ΛCDM cosmology is somewhat ambiguous because of the a posteriori nature of the observation. One physical mechanism that has been proposed as a possible explanation for the deficit in the large-angle temperature correlations is a suppression of primordial power on ∼ Gpc scales. To distinguish whether the anomaly is a signal of new physics, such as suppressed primordial power, it would be invaluable to perform experimental tests of the authenticity of this signal in data sets which are independent of the WMAP temperature measurements or even other CMB measurements. We explore the possibility of testing models of power suppression with large-scale structure observations, and compare the ability of planned photometric and spectroscopic surveys to constrain the power spectrum. Of the surveys planned for the next decade, a spectroscopic redshift survey such as BigBOSS will have a greater number of radial modes available for study, but we find that this advantage is outweighed by the greater surface density of high-redshift sources that willmore » be observed by photometric surveys such as LSST or Euclid. We also find that the ability to constrain primordial power suppression is insensitive to the precision of the calibration of photometric redshifts. We conclude that very-wide-area imaging surveys have the potential to probe viable models for the missing power but that it will be difficult to use such surveys to conclusively rule out primordial power suppression as the mechanism behind the observed anomaly.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Pittsburgh Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology Center and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22280223
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2011; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 1475-7516
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ANISOTROPY; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CORRELATIONS; COSMOLOGICAL CONSTANT; COSMOLOGY; DENSITY; GALAXIES; POTENTIALS; PROBES; RED SHIFT; RELICT RADIATION; TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

Citation Formats

Hearin, Andrew P., Zentner, Andrew R., and Gibelyou, Cameron, E-mail: aph15@pitt.edu, E-mail: gibelyou@umich.edu, E-mail: zentner@pitt.edu. Testing the origin of the CMB large-angle correlation deficit with a galaxy imaging survey. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2011/10/012.
Hearin, Andrew P., Zentner, Andrew R., & Gibelyou, Cameron, E-mail: aph15@pitt.edu, E-mail: gibelyou@umich.edu, E-mail: zentner@pitt.edu. Testing the origin of the CMB large-angle correlation deficit with a galaxy imaging survey. United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2011/10/012.
Hearin, Andrew P., Zentner, Andrew R., and Gibelyou, Cameron, E-mail: aph15@pitt.edu, E-mail: gibelyou@umich.edu, E-mail: zentner@pitt.edu. Sat . "Testing the origin of the CMB large-angle correlation deficit with a galaxy imaging survey". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2011/10/012.
@article{osti_22280223,
title = {Testing the origin of the CMB large-angle correlation deficit with a galaxy imaging survey},
author = {Hearin, Andrew P. and Zentner, Andrew R. and Gibelyou, Cameron, E-mail: aph15@pitt.edu, E-mail: gibelyou@umich.edu, E-mail: zentner@pitt.edu},
abstractNote = {The cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature distribution measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) exhibits anomalously low correlation at large angles. Quantifying the degree to which this feature in the temperature data is in conflict with standard ΛCDM cosmology is somewhat ambiguous because of the a posteriori nature of the observation. One physical mechanism that has been proposed as a possible explanation for the deficit in the large-angle temperature correlations is a suppression of primordial power on ∼ Gpc scales. To distinguish whether the anomaly is a signal of new physics, such as suppressed primordial power, it would be invaluable to perform experimental tests of the authenticity of this signal in data sets which are independent of the WMAP temperature measurements or even other CMB measurements. We explore the possibility of testing models of power suppression with large-scale structure observations, and compare the ability of planned photometric and spectroscopic surveys to constrain the power spectrum. Of the surveys planned for the next decade, a spectroscopic redshift survey such as BigBOSS will have a greater number of radial modes available for study, but we find that this advantage is outweighed by the greater surface density of high-redshift sources that will be observed by photometric surveys such as LSST or Euclid. We also find that the ability to constrain primordial power suppression is insensitive to the precision of the calibration of photometric redshifts. We conclude that very-wide-area imaging surveys have the potential to probe viable models for the missing power but that it will be difficult to use such surveys to conclusively rule out primordial power suppression as the mechanism behind the observed anomaly.},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2011/10/012},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
issn = {1475-7516},
number = 10,
volume = 2011,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {10}
}