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Title: An in-depth noise model for giant magnetoresistance current sensors for circuit design and complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor integration

Abstract

Full instrumentation bridges based on spin valve of giant magnetoresistance and magnetic tunnel junction devices have been microfabricated and experimentally characterized from the DC and noise viewpoint. A more realistic model of these devices was obtained in this work, an electrical and thermal model previously developed have been improved in such a way that noise effects are also included. We have implemented the model in a circuit simulator and reproduced the experimental measurements accurately. This provides a more realistic and complete tool for circuit design where magnetoresistive elements are combined with well-known complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor modules.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [5];  [3];  [6]
  1. Department of Electronics and Computer Technology, University of Granada (Spain)
  2. Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia (Spain)
  3. INESC-MN and IN, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal)
  4. (IST), Av. Rovisco Pais, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal)
  5. International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Braga (Portugal)
  6. (Portugal)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22273815
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 115; Journal Issue: 17; Conference: 55. annual conference on magnetism and magnetic materials, Atlanta, GA (United States), 14-18 Nov 2010; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; HETEROJUNCTIONS; MAGNETORESISTANCE; METALS; NOISE; OXIDES; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SENSORS; SIMULATORS; SPIN; TUNNEL EFFECT; VALVES

Citation Formats

Roldán, A., E-mail: amroldan@ugr.es, Roldán, J. B., Reig, C., Cardoso, S., Instituto Superior Técnico, Cardoso, F., Ferreira, R., Freitas, P. P., and International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Braga. An in-depth noise model for giant magnetoresistance current sensors for circuit design and complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor integration. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4865771.
Roldán, A., E-mail: amroldan@ugr.es, Roldán, J. B., Reig, C., Cardoso, S., Instituto Superior Técnico, Cardoso, F., Ferreira, R., Freitas, P. P., & International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Braga. An in-depth noise model for giant magnetoresistance current sensors for circuit design and complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor integration. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4865771.
Roldán, A., E-mail: amroldan@ugr.es, Roldán, J. B., Reig, C., Cardoso, S., Instituto Superior Técnico, Cardoso, F., Ferreira, R., Freitas, P. P., and International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Braga. Wed . "An in-depth noise model for giant magnetoresistance current sensors for circuit design and complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor integration". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4865771.
@article{osti_22273815,
title = {An in-depth noise model for giant magnetoresistance current sensors for circuit design and complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor integration},
author = {Roldán, A., E-mail: amroldan@ugr.es and Roldán, J. B. and Reig, C. and Cardoso, S. and Instituto Superior Técnico and Cardoso, F. and Ferreira, R. and Freitas, P. P. and International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Braga},
abstractNote = {Full instrumentation bridges based on spin valve of giant magnetoresistance and magnetic tunnel junction devices have been microfabricated and experimentally characterized from the DC and noise viewpoint. A more realistic model of these devices was obtained in this work, an electrical and thermal model previously developed have been improved in such a way that noise effects are also included. We have implemented the model in a circuit simulator and reproduced the experimental measurements accurately. This provides a more realistic and complete tool for circuit design where magnetoresistive elements are combined with well-known complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor modules.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4865771},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 17,
volume = 115,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 07 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed May 07 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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