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Title: An improved back projection algorithm of ultrasound tomography

Abstract

Binary logic back projection algorithm is improved in this work for the development of fast ultrasound tomography system with a better effect of image reconstruction. The new algorithm is characterized by an extra logical value ‘2’ and dual-threshold processing of collected raw data. To compare with the original algorithm, a numerical simulation was conducted by the verification of COMSOL simulations formerly, and then a set of ultrasonic tomography system is established to perform the experiments of one, two and three cylindrical objects. The object images are reconstructed through the inversion of signals matrix acquired by the transducer array after a preconditioning, while the corresponding spatial imaging errors can obviously indicate that the improved back projection method can achieve modified inversion effect.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Institute of Particle and Two-phase Flow Measurement, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22271097
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1592; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 8. international symposium on measurement techniques for multiphase flows, Guangzhou (China), 13-15 Dec 2013; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 97 MATHEMATICAL METHODS AND COMPUTING; ALGORITHMS; C CODES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CYLINDRICAL CONFIGURATION; IMAGE PROCESSING; MATRICES; TOMOGRAPHY; TRANSDUCERS; ULTRASONOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Xiaozhen, Chen, Mingxu, Su, and Xiaoshu, Cai. An improved back projection algorithm of ultrasound tomography. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4872081.
Xiaozhen, Chen, Mingxu, Su, & Xiaoshu, Cai. An improved back projection algorithm of ultrasound tomography. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4872081.
Xiaozhen, Chen, Mingxu, Su, and Xiaoshu, Cai. Fri . "An improved back projection algorithm of ultrasound tomography". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4872081.
@article{osti_22271097,
title = {An improved back projection algorithm of ultrasound tomography},
author = {Xiaozhen, Chen and Mingxu, Su and Xiaoshu, Cai},
abstractNote = {Binary logic back projection algorithm is improved in this work for the development of fast ultrasound tomography system with a better effect of image reconstruction. The new algorithm is characterized by an extra logical value ‘2’ and dual-threshold processing of collected raw data. To compare with the original algorithm, a numerical simulation was conducted by the verification of COMSOL simulations formerly, and then a set of ultrasonic tomography system is established to perform the experiments of one, two and three cylindrical objects. The object images are reconstructed through the inversion of signals matrix acquired by the transducer array after a preconditioning, while the corresponding spatial imaging errors can obviously indicate that the improved back projection method can achieve modified inversion effect.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4872081},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1592,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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