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Title: SHATTERING FLARES DURING CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF NEUTRON STARS

Abstract

We demonstrate that resonant shattering flares can occur during close passages of neutron stars in eccentric or hyperbolic encounters. We provide updated estimates for the rate of close encounters of compact objects in dense stellar environments, which we find are substantially lower than given in previous works. While such occurrences are rare, we show that shattering flares can provide a strong electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational wave bursts expected from such encounters, allowing triggered searches for these events to occur.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22270605
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 777; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; GALAXIES; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; NEUTRON STARS; STAR CLUSTERS; STELLAR FLARES

Citation Formats

Tsang, David, E-mail: dtsang@physics.mcgill.ca. SHATTERING FLARES DURING CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF NEUTRON STARS. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/777/2/103.
Tsang, David, E-mail: dtsang@physics.mcgill.ca. SHATTERING FLARES DURING CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF NEUTRON STARS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/777/2/103.
Tsang, David, E-mail: dtsang@physics.mcgill.ca. Sun . "SHATTERING FLARES DURING CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF NEUTRON STARS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/777/2/103.
@article{osti_22270605,
title = {SHATTERING FLARES DURING CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF NEUTRON STARS},
author = {Tsang, David, E-mail: dtsang@physics.mcgill.ca},
abstractNote = {We demonstrate that resonant shattering flares can occur during close passages of neutron stars in eccentric or hyperbolic encounters. We provide updated estimates for the rate of close encounters of compact objects in dense stellar environments, which we find are substantially lower than given in previous works. While such occurrences are rare, we show that shattering flares can provide a strong electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational wave bursts expected from such encounters, allowing triggered searches for these events to occur.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/777/2/103},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 777,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Nov 10 00:00:00 EST 2013},
month = {Sun Nov 10 00:00:00 EST 2013}
}
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