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Title: Q-factor of (In,Ga)N containing III-nitride microcavity grown by multiple deposition techniques

Abstract

A 3λ/2 (In,Ga)N/GaN resonant cavity, designed for ∼415 nm operation, is grown by molecular beam epitaxy and is sandwiched between a 39.5-period (In,Al)N/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), grown on c-plane GaN-on-sapphire pseudo-substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and an 8-period SiO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} DBR, deposited by electron beam evaporation. Optical characterization reveals an improvement in the cavity emission spectral purity of approximately one order of magnitude due to resonance effects. The combination of spectrophotometric and micro-reflectivity measurements confirms the strong quality (Q)-factor dependence on the excitation spot size. We derive simple analytical formulas to estimate leak and residual absorption losses and propose a simple approach to model the Q-factor and to give a quantitative estimation of the weight of cavity disorder. The model is in good agreement with both transfer-matrix simulation and the experimental findings. We point out that the realization of high Q-factor (In,Ga)N containing microcavities on GaN pseudo-substrates is likely to be limited by the cavity disorder.

Authors:
;  [1]; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)
  2. Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)
  3. Institut Pascal, UMR 6602 UBP/CNRS, Clermont Université, 24 Avenue des Landais, F-63177 Aubière Cedex (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22266120
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 23; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ABSORPTION; CAVITIES; DEPOSITION; DESIGN; ELECTRON BEAMS; EVAPORATION; EXCITATION; GALLIUM NITRIDES; IMPURITIES; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; REFLECTIVITY; SAPPHIRE; SILICA; SILICON OXIDES; SIMULATION; SPECTROPHOTOMETRY; SUBSTRATES; VAPOR PHASE EPITAXY; ZIRCONIUM OXIDES

Citation Formats

Gačević, Ž., E-mail: gacevic@isom.upm.es, Calleja, E., Rossbach, G., Butté, R., Glauser, M., Levrat, J., Cosendey, G., Carlin, J.-F., Grandjean, N., and Réveret, F. Q-factor of (In,Ga)N containing III-nitride microcavity grown by multiple deposition techniques. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4846218.
Gačević, Ž., E-mail: gacevic@isom.upm.es, Calleja, E., Rossbach, G., Butté, R., Glauser, M., Levrat, J., Cosendey, G., Carlin, J.-F., Grandjean, N., & Réveret, F. Q-factor of (In,Ga)N containing III-nitride microcavity grown by multiple deposition techniques. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4846218.
Gačević, Ž., E-mail: gacevic@isom.upm.es, Calleja, E., Rossbach, G., Butté, R., Glauser, M., Levrat, J., Cosendey, G., Carlin, J.-F., Grandjean, N., and Réveret, F. 2013. "Q-factor of (In,Ga)N containing III-nitride microcavity grown by multiple deposition techniques". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4846218.
@article{osti_22266120,
title = {Q-factor of (In,Ga)N containing III-nitride microcavity grown by multiple deposition techniques},
author = {Gačević, Ž., E-mail: gacevic@isom.upm.es and Calleja, E. and Rossbach, G. and Butté, R. and Glauser, M. and Levrat, J. and Cosendey, G. and Carlin, J.-F. and Grandjean, N. and Réveret, F.},
abstractNote = {A 3λ/2 (In,Ga)N/GaN resonant cavity, designed for ∼415 nm operation, is grown by molecular beam epitaxy and is sandwiched between a 39.5-period (In,Al)N/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), grown on c-plane GaN-on-sapphire pseudo-substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and an 8-period SiO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} DBR, deposited by electron beam evaporation. Optical characterization reveals an improvement in the cavity emission spectral purity of approximately one order of magnitude due to resonance effects. The combination of spectrophotometric and micro-reflectivity measurements confirms the strong quality (Q)-factor dependence on the excitation spot size. We derive simple analytical formulas to estimate leak and residual absorption losses and propose a simple approach to model the Q-factor and to give a quantitative estimation of the weight of cavity disorder. The model is in good agreement with both transfer-matrix simulation and the experimental findings. We point out that the realization of high Q-factor (In,Ga)N containing microcavities on GaN pseudo-substrates is likely to be limited by the cavity disorder.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4846218},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 23,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month =
}
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