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Title: Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments

Abstract

The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK and Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)
  2. Energy Technology and Innovation Initiative, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)
  3. Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22263758
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1581; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 40. annual review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation, Baltimore, MD (United States), 21-26 Jul 2013, 10. international conference on Barkhausen noise and micromagnetic testing, Baltimore, MD (United States), 21-26 Jul 2013; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CERAMICS; DOPED MATERIALS; DYSPROSIUM; ENGINEERING; EUROPIUM; NEODYMIUM LASERS; PEAKS; PLASMA; SENSORS; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

Citation Formats

Pilgrim, C. C., Heyes, A. L., and Feist, J. P. Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4865016.
Pilgrim, C. C., Heyes, A. L., & Feist, J. P. Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4865016.
Pilgrim, C. C., Heyes, A. L., and Feist, J. P. 2014. "Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4865016.
@article{osti_22263758,
title = {Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments},
author = {Pilgrim, C. C. and Heyes, A. L. and Feist, J. P.},
abstractNote = {The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4865016},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1581,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 2
}
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