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Title: Photoconductivity of graphene devices induced by terahertz radiation at various photon energies

Abstract

The influence of a magnetic field on Landau levels (LLs) in graphene-based devices is described via the magneto-optical response induced by terahertz (THz) radiation. For single-layer graphene, the resonance energies of the transitions between the on Landau levels (LLs) such as L{sub 1}, L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} fit quite well to the terahertz spectral range at low magnetic fields. Also, the calculations for the terahertz photoresponse (photoconductivity) in the presence of low magnetic fields, the reported calculations for the scattering rate of LLs, recent and our experimental results of photoresponse measurements yield that single-layer graphene is suitable for the detection of terahertz radiation.

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]; ;  [3]; ;  [4]
  1. NTH School for Contacts in Nanosystems, Germany and Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)
  2. Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)
  3. Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany)
  4. NTH School for Contacts in Nanosystems, Germany and Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22261865
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1566; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: ICPS 2012: 31. international conference on the physics of semiconductors, Zurich (Switzerland), 29 Jul - 3 Aug 2012; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; DETECTION; GRAPHENE; MAGNETIC FIELDS; PHOTOCONDUCTIVITY; PHOTONS

Citation Formats

Salman, M., Nachtwei, G., Gouider, F., Göthlich, M., Friedemann, M., Ahlers, F. J., Schmidt, H., and Haug, R. J.. Photoconductivity of graphene devices induced by terahertz radiation at various photon energies. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4848443.
Salman, M., Nachtwei, G., Gouider, F., Göthlich, M., Friedemann, M., Ahlers, F. J., Schmidt, H., & Haug, R. J.. Photoconductivity of graphene devices induced by terahertz radiation at various photon energies. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4848443.
Salman, M., Nachtwei, G., Gouider, F., Göthlich, M., Friedemann, M., Ahlers, F. J., Schmidt, H., and Haug, R. J.. Wed . "Photoconductivity of graphene devices induced by terahertz radiation at various photon energies". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4848443.
@article{osti_22261865,
title = {Photoconductivity of graphene devices induced by terahertz radiation at various photon energies},
author = {Salman, M. and Nachtwei, G. and Gouider, F. and Göthlich, M. and Friedemann, M. and Ahlers, F. J. and Schmidt, H. and Haug, R. J.},
abstractNote = {The influence of a magnetic field on Landau levels (LLs) in graphene-based devices is described via the magneto-optical response induced by terahertz (THz) radiation. For single-layer graphene, the resonance energies of the transitions between the on Landau levels (LLs) such as L{sub 1}, L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} fit quite well to the terahertz spectral range at low magnetic fields. Also, the calculations for the terahertz photoresponse (photoconductivity) in the presence of low magnetic fields, the reported calculations for the scattering rate of LLs, recent and our experimental results of photoresponse measurements yield that single-layer graphene is suitable for the detection of terahertz radiation.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4848443},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1566,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 04 00:00:00 EST 2013},
month = {Wed Dec 04 00:00:00 EST 2013}
}
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