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Title: A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron

Abstract

The project of the DC-110 cyclotron facility to provide applied research in the nanotechnologies (track pore membranes, surface modification of materials, etc.) has been designed by the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). The facility includes the isochronous cyclotron DC-110 for accelerating the intensive Ar, Kr, Xe ion beams with 2.5 MeV/nucleon fixed energy. The cyclotron is equipped with system of axial injection and ECR ion source DECRIS-5, operating at the frequency of 18 GHz. This article reviews the design and construction of DECRIS-5 ion source along with some initial commissioning results.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna, Moscow Reg. 141980 (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22253848
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: ICIS 2011: 14. international conference on ion sources, Giardini-Naxos, Sicily (Italy), 12-16 Sep 2011; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; COMMISSIONING; ECR ION SOURCES; GHZ RANGE; ION BEAMS; ISOCHRONOUS CYCLOTRONS; JINR; NANOSTRUCTURES; NUCLEAR REACTIONS; NUCLEONS; PARTICLE TRACKS; XENON IONS

Citation Formats

Efremov, A., E-mail: efremov@nrmail.jinr.ru, Bogomolov, S., Lebedev, A., Loginov, V., and Yazvitsky, N.. A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4833924.
Efremov, A., E-mail: efremov@nrmail.jinr.ru, Bogomolov, S., Lebedev, A., Loginov, V., & Yazvitsky, N.. A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4833924.
Efremov, A., E-mail: efremov@nrmail.jinr.ru, Bogomolov, S., Lebedev, A., Loginov, V., and Yazvitsky, N.. 2014. "A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4833924.
@article{osti_22253848,
title = {A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron},
author = {Efremov, A., E-mail: efremov@nrmail.jinr.ru and Bogomolov, S. and Lebedev, A. and Loginov, V. and Yazvitsky, N.},
abstractNote = {The project of the DC-110 cyclotron facility to provide applied research in the nanotechnologies (track pore membranes, surface modification of materials, etc.) has been designed by the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). The facility includes the isochronous cyclotron DC-110 for accelerating the intensive Ar, Kr, Xe ion beams with 2.5 MeV/nucleon fixed energy. The cyclotron is equipped with system of axial injection and ECR ion source DECRIS-5, operating at the frequency of 18 GHz. This article reviews the design and construction of DECRIS-5 ion source along with some initial commissioning results.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4833924},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 2,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 2
}
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