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Title: Trapping ultracold gases near cryogenic materials with rapid reconfigurability

Abstract

We demonstrate an atom chip trapping system that allows the placement and high-resolution imaging of ultracold atoms within microns from any ≲100 μm-thin, UHV-compatible material, while also allowing sample exchange with minimal experimental downtime. The sample is not connected to the atom chip, allowing rapid exchange without perturbing the atom chip or laser cooling apparatus. Exchange of the sample and retrapping of atoms has been performed within a week turnaround, limited only by chamber baking. Moreover, the decoupling of sample and atom chip provides the ability to independently tune the sample temperature and its position with respect to the trapped ultracold gas, which itself may remain in the focus of a high-resolution imaging system. As a first demonstration of this system, we have confined a 700-nK cloud of 8 × 10{sup 4} {sup 87}Rb atoms within 100 μm of a gold-mirrored 100-μm-thick silicon substrate. The substrate was cooled to 35 K without use of a heat shield, while the atom chip, 120 μm away, remained at room temperature. Atoms may be imaged and retrapped every 16 s, allowing rapid data collection.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Departments of Applied Physics and Physics and Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22253689
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 103; Journal Issue: 25; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ATOMS; BAKING; GASES; GOLD; HEAT; LASERS; MATERIALS; RESOLUTION; RUBIDIUM 87; SILICON; SUBSTRATES; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; TRAPPING

Citation Formats

Naides, Matthew A., Turner, Richard W., Lai, Ruby A., DiSciacca, Jack M., and Lev, Benjamin L. Trapping ultracold gases near cryogenic materials with rapid reconfigurability. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4852017.
Naides, Matthew A., Turner, Richard W., Lai, Ruby A., DiSciacca, Jack M., & Lev, Benjamin L. Trapping ultracold gases near cryogenic materials with rapid reconfigurability. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4852017.
Naides, Matthew A., Turner, Richard W., Lai, Ruby A., DiSciacca, Jack M., and Lev, Benjamin L. Mon . "Trapping ultracold gases near cryogenic materials with rapid reconfigurability". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4852017.
@article{osti_22253689,
title = {Trapping ultracold gases near cryogenic materials with rapid reconfigurability},
author = {Naides, Matthew A. and Turner, Richard W. and Lai, Ruby A. and DiSciacca, Jack M. and Lev, Benjamin L.},
abstractNote = {We demonstrate an atom chip trapping system that allows the placement and high-resolution imaging of ultracold atoms within microns from any ≲100 μm-thin, UHV-compatible material, while also allowing sample exchange with minimal experimental downtime. The sample is not connected to the atom chip, allowing rapid exchange without perturbing the atom chip or laser cooling apparatus. Exchange of the sample and retrapping of atoms has been performed within a week turnaround, limited only by chamber baking. Moreover, the decoupling of sample and atom chip provides the ability to independently tune the sample temperature and its position with respect to the trapped ultracold gas, which itself may remain in the focus of a high-resolution imaging system. As a first demonstration of this system, we have confined a 700-nK cloud of 8 × 10{sup 4} {sup 87}Rb atoms within 100 μm of a gold-mirrored 100-μm-thick silicon substrate. The substrate was cooled to 35 K without use of a heat shield, while the atom chip, 120 μm away, remained at room temperature. Atoms may be imaged and retrapped every 16 s, allowing rapid data collection.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4852017},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
issn = {0003-6951},
number = 25,
volume = 103,
place = {United States},
year = {2013},
month = {12}
}