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Title: Nuclear astrophysics in the laboratory and in the universe

Abstract

Nuclear processes drive stellar evolution and so nuclear physics, stellar models and observations together allow us to describe the inner workings of stars and their life stories. This Information on nuclear reaction rates and nuclear properties are critical ingredients in addressing most questions in astrophysics and often the nuclear database is incomplete or lacking the needed precision. Direct measurements of astrophysically-interesting reactions are necessary and the experimental focus is on improving both sensitivity and precision. In the following, we review recent results and approaches taken at the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA, http://research.physics.unc.edu/project/nuclearastro/Welcome.html )

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255, USA and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22253509
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Advances; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: (c) 2014 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCURACY; ASTROPHYSICS; NUCLEAR PHYSICS; NUCLEAR PROPERTIES; NUCLEAR REACTIONS; SENSITIVITY; STAR EVOLUTION

Citation Formats

Champagne, A. E., E-mail: artc@physics.unc.edu, Iliadis, C., and Longland, R.. Nuclear astrophysics in the laboratory and in the universe. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4864794.
Champagne, A. E., E-mail: artc@physics.unc.edu, Iliadis, C., & Longland, R.. Nuclear astrophysics in the laboratory and in the universe. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4864794.
Champagne, A. E., E-mail: artc@physics.unc.edu, Iliadis, C., and Longland, R.. Tue . "Nuclear astrophysics in the laboratory and in the universe". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4864794.
@article{osti_22253509,
title = {Nuclear astrophysics in the laboratory and in the universe},
author = {Champagne, A. E., E-mail: artc@physics.unc.edu and Iliadis, C. and Longland, R.},
abstractNote = {Nuclear processes drive stellar evolution and so nuclear physics, stellar models and observations together allow us to describe the inner workings of stars and their life stories. This Information on nuclear reaction rates and nuclear properties are critical ingredients in addressing most questions in astrophysics and often the nuclear database is incomplete or lacking the needed precision. Direct measurements of astrophysically-interesting reactions are necessary and the experimental focus is on improving both sensitivity and precision. In the following, we review recent results and approaches taken at the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA, http://research.physics.unc.edu/project/nuclearastro/Welcome.html )},
doi = {10.1063/1.4864794},
journal = {AIP Advances},
number = 4,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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