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Title: Water dissociation on Ni(100) and Ni(111): Effect of surface temperature on reactivity

Abstract

Water adsorption and dissociation on Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces are studied using density functional theory calculations. Water adsorbs on top site on both the surfaces, while H and OH adsorb on four fold hollow and three fold hollow (fcc) sites on Ni(100) and Ni(111), respectively. Transition states (TS) on both surfaces are identified using climbing image-nudged elastic band method. It is found that the barrier to dissociation on Ni(100) surface is slightly lower than that on Ni(111) surface. Dissociation on both the surfaces is exothermic, while the exothermicity on Ni(100) is large. To study the effect of lattice motion on the energy barrier, TS calculations are performed for various values of Q (lattice atom coordinate along the surface normal) and the change in the barrier height and position is determined. Calculations show that the energy barrier to reaction decreases with increasing Q and increases with decreasing Q on both the surfaces. Dissociation probability values at different surface temperatures are computed using semi-classical approximation. Results show that the influence of surface temperature on dissociation probability on the Ni(100) is significantly larger compared to that of Ni(111). Moreover, on Ni(100), a dramatic shift in energy barrier to lower incident energy values ismore » observed with increasing surface temperature, while the shift is smaller in the case of Ni(111)« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Mohanpur 741252 (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22251527
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 139; Journal Issue: 17; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ADSORPTION; APPROXIMATIONS; DENSITY FUNCTIONAL METHOD; DISSOCIATION; SURFACES; WATER

Citation Formats

Seenivasan, H., and Tiwari, Ashwani K., E-mail: ashwani@iiserkol.ac.in. Water dissociation on Ni(100) and Ni(111): Effect of surface temperature on reactivity. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4827641.
Seenivasan, H., & Tiwari, Ashwani K., E-mail: ashwani@iiserkol.ac.in. Water dissociation on Ni(100) and Ni(111): Effect of surface temperature on reactivity. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4827641.
Seenivasan, H., and Tiwari, Ashwani K., E-mail: ashwani@iiserkol.ac.in. 2013. "Water dissociation on Ni(100) and Ni(111): Effect of surface temperature on reactivity". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4827641.
@article{osti_22251527,
title = {Water dissociation on Ni(100) and Ni(111): Effect of surface temperature on reactivity},
author = {Seenivasan, H. and Tiwari, Ashwani K., E-mail: ashwani@iiserkol.ac.in},
abstractNote = {Water adsorption and dissociation on Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces are studied using density functional theory calculations. Water adsorbs on top site on both the surfaces, while H and OH adsorb on four fold hollow and three fold hollow (fcc) sites on Ni(100) and Ni(111), respectively. Transition states (TS) on both surfaces are identified using climbing image-nudged elastic band method. It is found that the barrier to dissociation on Ni(100) surface is slightly lower than that on Ni(111) surface. Dissociation on both the surfaces is exothermic, while the exothermicity on Ni(100) is large. To study the effect of lattice motion on the energy barrier, TS calculations are performed for various values of Q (lattice atom coordinate along the surface normal) and the change in the barrier height and position is determined. Calculations show that the energy barrier to reaction decreases with increasing Q and increases with decreasing Q on both the surfaces. Dissociation probability values at different surface temperatures are computed using semi-classical approximation. Results show that the influence of surface temperature on dissociation probability on the Ni(100) is significantly larger compared to that of Ni(111). Moreover, on Ni(100), a dramatic shift in energy barrier to lower incident energy values is observed with increasing surface temperature, while the shift is smaller in the case of Ni(111)},
doi = {10.1063/1.4827641},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 17,
volume = 139,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month =
}
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