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Title: Dynamics of coupled simplest chaotic two-component electronic circuits and its potential application to random bit generation

Abstract

We numerically investigate the possibility of using a coupling to increase the complexity in simplest chaotic two-component electronic circuits operating at high frequency. We subsequently show that complex behaviors generated in such coupled systems, together with the post-processing are suitable for generating bit-streams which pass all the NIST tests for randomness. The electronic circuit is built up by unidirectionally coupling three two-component (one active and one passive) oscillators in a ring configuration through resistances. It turns out that, with such a coupling, high chaotic signals can be obtained. By extracting points at fixed interval of 10 ns (corresponding to a bit rate of 100 Mb/s) on such chaotic signals, each point being simultaneously converted in 16-bits (or 8-bits), we find that the binary sequence constructed by including the 10(or 2) least significant bits pass statistical tests of randomness, meaning that bit-streams with random properties can be achieved with an overall bit rate up to 10×100 Mb/s =1Gbit/s (or 2×100 Mb/s =200 Megabit/s). Moreover, by varying the bias voltages, we also investigate the parameter range for which more complex signals can be obtained. Besides being simple to implement, the two-component electronic circuit setup is very cheap as compared to optical and electro-optical systems.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Applied Physics Research Group, APHY, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussel (Belgium)
  2. Laboratory of Electronics, Automation and Signal Processing, Department of Physics, University of Dschang, P.O. Box 67, Dschang (Cameroon)
  3. Laboratory of Modelling and Simulation in Engineering and Biological Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaoundé I, P.O. Box 812, Yaoundé (Cameroon)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22251379
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chaos (Woodbury, N. Y.); Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AMINO ACIDS; CHAOS THEORY; COUPLING; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; OPTICAL SYSTEMS; POTENTIALS; RANDOMNESS; SIGNALS; STREAMS

Citation Formats

Modeste Nguimdo, Romain, E-mail: Romain.Nguimdo@vub.ac.be, Tchitnga, Robert, and Woafo, Paul. Dynamics of coupled simplest chaotic two-component electronic circuits and its potential application to random bit generation. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4833115.
Modeste Nguimdo, Romain, E-mail: Romain.Nguimdo@vub.ac.be, Tchitnga, Robert, & Woafo, Paul. Dynamics of coupled simplest chaotic two-component electronic circuits and its potential application to random bit generation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4833115.
Modeste Nguimdo, Romain, E-mail: Romain.Nguimdo@vub.ac.be, Tchitnga, Robert, and Woafo, Paul. 2013. "Dynamics of coupled simplest chaotic two-component electronic circuits and its potential application to random bit generation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4833115.
@article{osti_22251379,
title = {Dynamics of coupled simplest chaotic two-component electronic circuits and its potential application to random bit generation},
author = {Modeste Nguimdo, Romain, E-mail: Romain.Nguimdo@vub.ac.be and Tchitnga, Robert and Woafo, Paul},
abstractNote = {We numerically investigate the possibility of using a coupling to increase the complexity in simplest chaotic two-component electronic circuits operating at high frequency. We subsequently show that complex behaviors generated in such coupled systems, together with the post-processing are suitable for generating bit-streams which pass all the NIST tests for randomness. The electronic circuit is built up by unidirectionally coupling three two-component (one active and one passive) oscillators in a ring configuration through resistances. It turns out that, with such a coupling, high chaotic signals can be obtained. By extracting points at fixed interval of 10 ns (corresponding to a bit rate of 100 Mb/s) on such chaotic signals, each point being simultaneously converted in 16-bits (or 8-bits), we find that the binary sequence constructed by including the 10(or 2) least significant bits pass statistical tests of randomness, meaning that bit-streams with random properties can be achieved with an overall bit rate up to 10×100 Mb/s =1Gbit/s (or 2×100 Mb/s =200 Megabit/s). Moreover, by varying the bias voltages, we also investigate the parameter range for which more complex signals can be obtained. Besides being simple to implement, the two-component electronic circuit setup is very cheap as compared to optical and electro-optical systems.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4833115},
journal = {Chaos (Woodbury, N. Y.)},
number = 4,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month =
}
  • We numerically investigate the possibility of using a coupling to increase the complexity in simplest chaotic two-component electronic circuits operating at high frequency. We subsequently show that complex behaviors generated in such coupled systems, together with the post-processing are suitable for generating bit-streams which pass all the NIST tests for randomness. The electronic circuit is built up by unidirectionally coupling three two-component (one active and one passive) oscillators in a ring configuration through resistances. It turns out that, with such a coupling, high chaotic signals can be obtained. By extracting points at fixed interval of 10 ns (corresponding to a bitmore » rate of 100 Mb/s) on such chaotic signals, each point being simultaneously converted in 16-bits (or 8-bits), we find that the binary sequence constructed by including the 10(or 2) least significant bits pass statistical tests of randomness, meaning that bit-streams with random properties can be achieved with an overall bit rate up to 10×100 Mb/s =1Gbit/s (or 2×100 Mb/s =200 Megabit/s). Moreover, by varying the bias voltages, we also investigate the parameter range for which more complex signals can be obtained. Besides being simple to implement, the two-component electronic circuit setup is very cheap as compared to optical and electro-optical systems.« less
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