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Title: Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling

Abstract

In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information—inside hotspots or in search of them—based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km{sup 2}. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection formore » exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2 dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96. -- Highlights: • We present an iterative measurement and modeling method for outdoor RF-EMF exposure. • Hotspots are rapidly identified, and accurately characterized. • An accurate graphical representation, or heat map, is created, using kriging. • Random validation shows good correlation (0.7) and low relative errors (2 dB)« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22246956
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Research; Journal Volume: 126; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; ELECTRIC FIELDS; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; HEAT; ITERATIVE METHODS; KRIGING; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIATION SOURCES; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; SAMPLING; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Aerts, Sam, E-mail: sam.aerts@intec.ugent.be, Deschrijver, Dirk, Verloock, Leen, Dhaene, Tom, Martens, Luc, and Joseph, Wout. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1016/J.ENVRES.2013.05.005.
Aerts, Sam, E-mail: sam.aerts@intec.ugent.be, Deschrijver, Dirk, Verloock, Leen, Dhaene, Tom, Martens, Luc, & Joseph, Wout. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling. United States. doi:10.1016/J.ENVRES.2013.05.005.
Aerts, Sam, E-mail: sam.aerts@intec.ugent.be, Deschrijver, Dirk, Verloock, Leen, Dhaene, Tom, Martens, Luc, and Joseph, Wout. 2013. "Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling". United States. doi:10.1016/J.ENVRES.2013.05.005.
@article{osti_22246956,
title = {Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling},
author = {Aerts, Sam, E-mail: sam.aerts@intec.ugent.be and Deschrijver, Dirk and Verloock, Leen and Dhaene, Tom and Martens, Luc and Joseph, Wout},
abstractNote = {In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information—inside hotspots or in search of them—based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km{sup 2}. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2 dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96. -- Highlights: • We present an iterative measurement and modeling method for outdoor RF-EMF exposure. • Hotspots are rapidly identified, and accurately characterized. • An accurate graphical representation, or heat map, is created, using kriging. • Random validation shows good correlation (0.7) and low relative errors (2 dB)},
doi = {10.1016/J.ENVRES.2013.05.005},
journal = {Environmental Research},
number = ,
volume = 126,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month =
}
  • This article is a systematic review of whether everyday exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) causes symptoms, and whether some individuals are able to detect low-level RF-EMF (below the ICNIRP [International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection] guidelines). Peer-reviewed articles published before August 2007 were identified by means of a systematic literature search. Meta-analytic techniques were used to pool the results from studies investigating the ability to discriminate active from sham RF-EMF exposure. RF-EMF discrimination was investigated in seven studies including a total of 182 self-declared electromagnetic hypersensitive (EHS) individuals and 332 non-EHS individuals. The pooled correct field detection rate wasmore » 4.2% better than expected by chance (95% CI: -2.1 to 10.5). There was no evidence that EHS individuals could detect presence or absence of RF-EMF better than other persons. There was little evidence that short-term exposure to a mobile phone or base station causes symptoms based on the results of eight randomized trials investigating 194 EHS and 346 non-EHS individuals in a laboratory. Some of the trials provided evidence for the occurrence of nocebo effects. In population based studies an association between symptoms and exposure to RF-EMF in the everyday environment was repeatedly observed. This review showed that the large majority of individuals who claims to be able to detect low level RF-EMF are not able to do so under double-blind conditions. If such individuals exist, they represent a small minority and have not been identified yet. The available observational studies do not allow differentiating between biophysical from EMF and nocebo effects.« less
  • When cost per evaluation on a system of interest is high, surrogate systems can provide cheaper but lower-fidelity information. In the proposed extension of the sequential kriging optimization method, surrogate systems are exploited to reduce the total evaluation cost. The method utilizes data on all systems to build a kriging metamodel that provides a global prediction of the objective function and a measure of prediction uncertainty. The location and fidelity level of the next evaluation are selected by maximizing an augmented expected improvement function, which is connected with the evaluation costs. The proposed method was applied to test functions frommore » the literature and a metal-forming process design problem via finite element simulations. The method manifests sensible search patterns, robust performance, and appreciable reduction in total evaluation cost as compared to the original method.« less
  • When cost per evaluation on a system of interest is high, surrogate systems can provide cheaper but lower-fidelity information. In the proposed extension of the sequential kriging optimization method, surrogate systems are exploited to reduce the total evaluation cost. The method utilizes data on all systems to build a kriging metamodel that provides a global prediction of the objective function and a measure of prediction uncertainty. The location and fidelity level of the next evaluation are selected by maximizing an augmented expected improvement function, which is connected with the evaluation costs. The proposed method was applied to test functions frommore » the literature and a metal-forming process design problem via finite element simulations. The method manifests sensible search patterns, robust performance, and appreciable reduction in total evaluation cost as compared to the original method.« less
  • Abstract not provided.
  • One problem that has limited past epidemiologic studies of cancer and exposure to extremely low-frequency (0-100 Hz) electric and magnetic fields has been the lack of adequate methods for assessing personal exposure to these fields. A new 60-Hz electromagnetic field dosimeter was tested to assess occupational and residential exposures of a group of electrical utility workers and a comparison background group over a 7-day period. Comparing work periods only, utility workers' exposures were significantly higher than background levels by a factor of about 10 for electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields and by a factor of 171 for high-frequency transientmore » electric (HFTE) fields. When overall weekly time-weighted averages combining work and nonwork exposures were compared, ratios of the exposed to background groups were lower. B and HFTE exposure ratios remained statistically significant, with values of 3.5 and 58, respectively, whereas the electric field exposure ratio was no longer significant, with a value of 1.7. E-field exposures of the background group were the highest during the nonwork period, probably reflecting the use of electrical appliances at home. Residential E- and B-field exposures were in the same range as published results from other surveys, whereas occupational E-field exposures tended to be lower than exposures reported in other studies. The high variability associated with occupational exposures probably accounts for the latter discrepancy. Worker acceptance of wearing the dosimeter was good: 95% of participants found it to be of little or no inconvenience while at work. At home, 37% found the device to be inconvenient in its present form but would not object to wearing a slightly smaller and lighter dosimeter.« less