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Title: Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

Abstract

Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantlymore » suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22242249
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 443; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALCOHOLS; ANTIGENS; ASTHMA; CELL PROLIFERATION; GTP-ASES; INFLAMMATION; LUNGS; LYMPH NODES; MICE; NEOPLASMS; OVA; SIDE EFFECTS; SPLEEN CELLS

Citation Formats

Imamura, Mitsuru, Sasaki, Oh, Okunishi, Katsuhide, Nakagome, Kazuyuki, Harada, Hiroaki, Kawahata, Kimito, Tanaka, Ryoichi, Yamamoto, Kazuhiko, Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp, and Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2013.11.106.
Imamura, Mitsuru, Sasaki, Oh, Okunishi, Katsuhide, Nakagome, Kazuyuki, Harada, Hiroaki, Kawahata, Kimito, Tanaka, Ryoichi, Yamamoto, Kazuhiko, Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp, & Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2013.11.106.
Imamura, Mitsuru, Sasaki, Oh, Okunishi, Katsuhide, Nakagome, Kazuyuki, Harada, Hiroaki, Kawahata, Kimito, Tanaka, Ryoichi, Yamamoto, Kazuhiko, Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp, and Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo. Fri . "Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2013.11.106.
@article{osti_22242249,
title = {Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung},
author = {Imamura, Mitsuru and Sasaki, Oh and Okunishi, Katsuhide and Nakagome, Kazuyuki and Harada, Hiroaki and Kawahata, Kimito and Tanaka, Ryoichi and Yamamoto, Kazuhiko and Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp and Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo},
abstractNote = {Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2013.11.106},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 443,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 03 00:00:00 EST 2014},
month = {Fri Jan 03 00:00:00 EST 2014}
}
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