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Title: Lessons Learned on University Education Programs of Chemical Engineering Principles for Nuclear Plant Operations - 13588

Abstract

University education aims to supply qualified human resources for industries. In complex large scale engineering systems such as nuclear power plants, the importance of qualified human resources cannot be underestimated. The corresponding education program should involve many topics systematically. Recently a nuclear engineering program has been initiated in Dongguk University, South Korea. The current education program focuses on undergraduate level nuclear engineering students. Our main objective is to provide industries fresh engineers with the understanding on the interconnection of local parts and the entire systems of nuclear power plants and the associated systems. From the experience there is a huge opportunity for chemical engineering disciple in the context of giving macroscopic overview on nuclear power plant and waste treatment management by strengthening the analyzing capability of fundamental situations. (authors)

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Nuclear and Energy System, Dongguk University, Gyeongju Campus, Gyeongju, 780-714 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9-332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22225144
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-13-WM-13588
TRN: US14V0730046099
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2013: Waste Management Conference: International collaboration and continuous improvement, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 24-28 Feb 2013; Other Information: Country of input: France
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
96 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND PRESERVATION; CHEMICAL ENGINEERING; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; NUCLEAR ENGINEERING; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; REPUBLIC OF KOREA; WASTE PROCESSING

Citation Formats

Ryu, Jun-hyung. Lessons Learned on University Education Programs of Chemical Engineering Principles for Nuclear Plant Operations - 13588. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Ryu, Jun-hyung. Lessons Learned on University Education Programs of Chemical Engineering Principles for Nuclear Plant Operations - 13588. United States.
Ryu, Jun-hyung. Mon . "Lessons Learned on University Education Programs of Chemical Engineering Principles for Nuclear Plant Operations - 13588". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_22225144,
title = {Lessons Learned on University Education Programs of Chemical Engineering Principles for Nuclear Plant Operations - 13588},
author = {Ryu, Jun-hyung},
abstractNote = {University education aims to supply qualified human resources for industries. In complex large scale engineering systems such as nuclear power plants, the importance of qualified human resources cannot be underestimated. The corresponding education program should involve many topics systematically. Recently a nuclear engineering program has been initiated in Dongguk University, South Korea. The current education program focuses on undergraduate level nuclear engineering students. Our main objective is to provide industries fresh engineers with the understanding on the interconnection of local parts and the entire systems of nuclear power plants and the associated systems. From the experience there is a huge opportunity for chemical engineering disciple in the context of giving macroscopic overview on nuclear power plant and waste treatment management by strengthening the analyzing capability of fundamental situations. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Conference:
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