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Title: Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

Abstract

The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States)
  2. United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States)
  3. HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9-332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22225140
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-13-WM-13583
TRN: US14V0725046095
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2013: Waste Management Conference: International collaboration and continuous improvement, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 24-28 Feb 2013; Other Information: Country of input: France; 4 refs.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; APPROXIMATIONS; CALIFORNIA; GAMMA RADIATION; GAMMA SPECTROMETERS; METERS; RADIATION DETECTION; RADIATION DETECTORS; TOPOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Palladino, Carl, Mason, Bryan, Engle, Matt, LeVangie, James, Dempsey, Gregg, and Klemovich, Ron. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Palladino, Carl, Mason, Bryan, Engle, Matt, LeVangie, James, Dempsey, Gregg, & Klemovich, Ron. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583. United States.
Palladino, Carl, Mason, Bryan, Engle, Matt, LeVangie, James, Dempsey, Gregg, and Klemovich, Ron. 2013. "Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_22225140,
title = {Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583},
author = {Palladino, Carl and Mason, Bryan and Engle, Matt and LeVangie, James and Dempsey, Gregg and Klemovich, Ron},
abstractNote = {The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines.more » To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were calculated. From the scanning data, locations with observed Cs-137 ratios exceeding six standard deviations above the mean ratio were mapped in high resolution [2]. Field teams returned to those locations to collect static count measurements using the same detection systems. Soil surface samples were collected at 30 locations and analyzed for Cs-137. An exponential correlation was identified between Cs-137 concentrations in surface soil and field-scanned Cs-137 ratios. The data indicate field minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of Cs-137 at 0.02 Bq/g (0.5 pCi/g) or lower depending on contaminant distribution in soil. (authors)« less
  • Performance of four different types of fuel failure detection systems has been studied using a sodium in-pile loop located in Japan Research Reactor No. 2. In the sodium in-pile loop, 8.5 liter sodium circulates through an irradiation section (500$sup 0$C), a main cooler (400$sup 0$C), an expansion tank (380$sup 0$C), an electromagnetic pump, and a main heater at a flow rate of 3 liters/min. In the irradiation section, four metallic uranium (20 percent enriched) plates of a total amount of U-235 of 9.18g had been irradiated at a thermal neutron flux of 5.4 x 10$sup 10$ n/cm$sup 2$ sec. Amore » delayed neutron detector consisting of a BF$sub 3$ counter system in a graphite moderator (50 cm x 50 cm x 80 cm) detects delayed neutrons from fission products in the expansion tank. Helium cover gas over the sodium in the expansion tank carries gaseous fission products to a precipitator by which beta-rays from Rb-88 and Cs-138 collected on the precipitator wire are detected. The precipitator was modified to measure gamma-ray spectra from the wire using a Ge(Li) detector system for the nuclide identification. The helium gas is also guided into a gas reservoir whose gamma-ray spectra are analyzed by another Ge(Li) detector system. Construction and performance of these detection systems is described in detail and their detection sensitivities and response are compared.« less