skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555

Abstract

As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data densitymore » was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3]
  1. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States)
  2. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States)
  3. Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9-332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22225122
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-13-WM-13555
TRN: US14V0701046077
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2013: Waste Management Conference: International collaboration and continuous improvement, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 24-28 Feb 2013; Other Information: Country of input: France; 5 refs.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ANL; CONTAMINATION; DECONTAMINATION; EXCAVATION; RADIOECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; REMEDIAL ACTION; SAMPLING; SOILS; STATISTICAL MODELS; US CORPS OF ENGINEERS

Citation Formats

Moore, James, Hays, David, Quinn, John, Johnson, Robert, and Durham, Lisa. Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Moore, James, Hays, David, Quinn, John, Johnson, Robert, & Durham, Lisa. Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555. United States.
Moore, James, Hays, David, Quinn, John, Johnson, Robert, and Durham, Lisa. Mon . "Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_22225122,
title = {Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555},
author = {Moore, James and Hays, David and Quinn, John and Johnson, Robert and Durham, Lisa},
abstractNote = {As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • The former Linde site in Tonawanda, New York is currently undergoing active remediation of Manhattan Engineering District's radiological contamination. This remediation is authorized under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The focus of this paper will be to describe the impact of soil characterization efforts as they relate to soil volume estimates and project cost estimates. An additional objective is to stimulate discussion about other characterization and modeling technologies, and to provide a ''Lessons Learned'' scenario to assist in future volume estimating at other FUSRAP sites. Initial soil characterization efforts at the Linde FUSRAP site in areas knownmore » to be contaminated or suspected to be contaminated were presented in the Remedial Investigation Report for the Tonawanda Site, dated February 1993. Results of those initial characterization efforts were the basis for soil volume estimates that were used to estimate and negotiate the current remediation contract. During the course of remediation, previously unidentified areas of contamination were discovered, and additional characterization was initiated. Additional test pit and geoprobe samples were obtained at over 500 locations, bringing the total to over 800 sample locations at the 135-acre site. New data continues to be collected on a routine basis during ongoing remedial actions.« less
  • As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program properties, Argonne National Laboratory assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District in revising contaminated soil volume estimates for the remaining areas of the Stepan/Sears properties that require soil remediation. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information,more » aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations; both sampling results and down-hole gamma data were coded to identify whether the results indicated the presence of contamination above site cleanup requirements. Significant effort was invested in developing complete electronic data sets for the site by incorporating data contained in various scanned documents, maps, etc. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and upper and lower bounds on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. The site-wide contaminated volume estimate (with associated uncertainty) was adjusted to reflect areas where remediation was complete; the result was a revised estimate of the remaining soil volumes requiring remediation that the USACE could use for planning. Other environmental projects may benefit from this process for estimating the volume of contaminated soil. A comparison of sample and DHG results for various stations with the site ICSM provides one measure of the quality of site understanding relative to the presence of contamination and its likely extent. A second measure of the quality of a contaminated soil volume estimate, in the case of BAASS, is a comparison of the best guess volume estimate with the conservative volume estimate. For Maywood, the conservative volume estimate is more than double the best guess. The data available for the site indicate that the preponderance of this difference is attributable to uncertainty about the exact depth of known contamination. The observed depth of contamination based on sample results and DHG data often varied significantly among adjacent soil cores. In the case of Maywood, where a significant amount of remediation has already taken place, a third measure of the quality of the volume estimates is the retrospective estimate of contaminated soil volumes for areas that have already been remediated [2]. The USACE is currently comparing the latest BAASS volume estimates for those areas with records indicating what was actually removed. (authors)« less
  • The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) is the US government program started in 1974 to identify, investigate and clean up or control sites that became contaminated as a result of the nation's early atomic programs. Many of these sites are not owned by the federal government and therefore require owner permission to enter. The experience in pursuing such access at the FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site (the Maywood Site or the Site) in Bergen County, New Jersey, is extensive. Since the US Army Corps of Engineers (the Corps) assumed responsibility for the Maywood Site from the US Department ofmore » Energy in 1997, at least 186 separate property access agreements (known in FUSRAP as a Real Estate Right-of- Entry or ROE) have been executed between the Corps and approximately 55 different land owners and tenant occupants at the Maywood Site (agreement renewals with the same owners over time account for the difference). Maywood's experience during the Corps' tenure, reflected here in three case studies of representative property access efforts, offers some lessons and best practices that may apply to other remedial programs. While the Site Community Relations Manager (the author of this paper) managed the property access task, multi-disciplinary support from across the project was also critical to success in this endeavor. (authors)« less
  • Estimates of the volume of radionuclide contaminated soil which must be excavated require data on the depth distribution of the contamination. Using a novel uncomplicated approach, vertical activity distribution data were obtained on a 1400 m/sup 2/ site. The volume of contaminated soil which had to be excavated was estimated to be between 227 and 425 m/sup 3/. When the site cleanup was done, 312 m/sup 3/ of contaminated soil had to be removed to satisfy the cleanup criteria. The basic approach was to drill 193 holes over the entire site and to make measurements in each using a detectormore » with a side-looking collimator. Soil samples from the holes were analyzed only to the extent necessary to obtain sufficient data for demonstrating a correlation between count rate and activity concentration in the soil. The site was then conceptually sliced into vertical strips of contamination concern. The product of the contamination depths which exceeded cleanup criteria and the areas of the slices gave the volume of excavation required.« less
  • The monitoring program at the MISS measures thoron and radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and throium, uranium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess the potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, the maximally exposed individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 1% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure ismore » less than the exposure a person would receive during a round-trip flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation present at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50 mile) radium of the MISS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1987 monitoring show that the MISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 17 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.« less