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Title: The Regulatory Challenges of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants in Korea - 13101

Abstract

As of 2012, 23 units of nuclear power plants are in operation, but there is no experience of permanent shutdown and decommissioning of nuclear power plant in Korea. It is realized that, since late 1990's, improvement of the regulatory framework for decommissioning has been emphasized constantly from the point of view of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s safety standards. And it is known that now IAEA prepare the safety requirement on decommissioning of facilities, its title is the Safe Decommissioning of Facilities, General Safety Requirement Part 6. According to the result of IAEA's Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission to Korea in 2011, it was recommended that the regulatory framework for decommissioning should require decommissioning plans for nuclear installations to be constructed and operated and these plans should be updated periodically. In addition, after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan in March of 2011, preparedness for early decommissioning caused by an unexpected severe accident became also important issues and concerns. In this respect, it is acknowledged that the regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Korea need to be improved. First of all, we identify the current status and relevant issues of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear powermore » plants compared to the IAEA's safety standards in order to achieve our goal. And then the plan is to be established for improvement of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea. After dealing with it, it is expected that the revised regulatory framework for decommissioning could enhance the safety regime on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea in light of international standards. (authors)« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)
  2. FNC Technology, 46 Tabsil-ro, Giheung-gu, Yongin 446-902 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9-332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22224886
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-13-WM-13101
TRN: US14V0323045841
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2013: Waste Management Conference: International collaboration and continuous improvement, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 24-28 Feb 2013; Other Information: Country of input: France; 7 refs.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; DECOMMISSIONING; FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NUCLEAR POWER STATION; IAEA; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PERIODICITY; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; REPUBLIC OF KOREA; REVIEWS; SAFETY; SAFETY STANDARDS

Citation Formats

Lee, Jungjoon, Ahn, Sangmyeon, Choi, Kyungwoo, Kim, Juyoul, and Kim, Juyub. The Regulatory Challenges of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants in Korea - 13101. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Lee, Jungjoon, Ahn, Sangmyeon, Choi, Kyungwoo, Kim, Juyoul, & Kim, Juyub. The Regulatory Challenges of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants in Korea - 13101. United States.
Lee, Jungjoon, Ahn, Sangmyeon, Choi, Kyungwoo, Kim, Juyoul, and Kim, Juyub. 2013. "The Regulatory Challenges of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants in Korea - 13101". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_22224886,
title = {The Regulatory Challenges of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants in Korea - 13101},
author = {Lee, Jungjoon and Ahn, Sangmyeon and Choi, Kyungwoo and Kim, Juyoul and Kim, Juyub},
abstractNote = {As of 2012, 23 units of nuclear power plants are in operation, but there is no experience of permanent shutdown and decommissioning of nuclear power plant in Korea. It is realized that, since late 1990's, improvement of the regulatory framework for decommissioning has been emphasized constantly from the point of view of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s safety standards. And it is known that now IAEA prepare the safety requirement on decommissioning of facilities, its title is the Safe Decommissioning of Facilities, General Safety Requirement Part 6. According to the result of IAEA's Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission to Korea in 2011, it was recommended that the regulatory framework for decommissioning should require decommissioning plans for nuclear installations to be constructed and operated and these plans should be updated periodically. In addition, after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan in March of 2011, preparedness for early decommissioning caused by an unexpected severe accident became also important issues and concerns. In this respect, it is acknowledged that the regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Korea need to be improved. First of all, we identify the current status and relevant issues of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants compared to the IAEA's safety standards in order to achieve our goal. And then the plan is to be established for improvement of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea. After dealing with it, it is expected that the revised regulatory framework for decommissioning could enhance the safety regime on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea in light of international standards. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • We are having 23 units of nuclear power plants in operation and 5 units of nuclear power plants under construction in Korea as of September 2012. However, we don't have any experience on shutdown permanently and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. There are only two research reactors being decommissioned since 1997. It is realized that improvement of the regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear facilities has been emphasized constantly from the point of view of IAEA's safety standards. It is also known that IAEA will prepare the safety requirement on decommissioning of facilities; its title is the Safe Decommissioning ofmore » Facilities, General Safety Requirement Part 6. According to the result of IAEA's Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission to Korea in 2011, it was recommended that the regulatory framework should require decommissioning plans for nuclear installations to be constructed and operated and these plans should be updated periodically. In addition, after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan in March of 2011, preparedness for early decommissioning caused by an unexpected severe accident became important issues and concerns. In this respect, it is acknowledged that the regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Korea need to be improved. First of all, we focus on identifying the current status and relevant issues of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants compared to the IAEA's safety standards in order to achieve our goal. And then the plan is established for improvement of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea. It is expected that if the things will go forward as planned, the revised regulatory framework for decommissioning could enhance the safety regime on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea in light of international standards. (authors)« less
  • Power generation availability factor has become an important issue from an economical standpoint as well as from the controlled operation of nuclear plants. A rapid growth in electricity demands has far outpaced the growth in generation capacity in Korea, and it has become clear that increasing the availability factor of existing plants is effective means of both reducing the capital investment into the new generation capacity and taking the full advantages of the existing plants. The effective nuclear generation availability factor may be increased by extending the fuel cycles or by reducing the outage duration which rely on focusing themore » effort on the optimization of known activities and resources. On the other hands, the forced outages, caused by the malfunction of equipment can result in unwarranted decrease in availability factor and may occur without a warning which can have severe impact on the power generations, specially during the peak tim in summer. Therefore it is critical to prevent such forced outages to begin with and to store the power generation as soon as possible when a forced outage occurs, which will improve the overall generation availability factor. In order to prevent equipment malfunction and to respond quickly to problems that arise, it is important to keep track of daily operational and maintenance records at the plant and utilize them effectively. There are few who deny the importance of maintaining plant operational and maintenance records. This paper describes a PC-based networked computer system for maintenance data use and management.« less
  • Currently there are 20 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation, and 6 more units are under construction in Korea. The control systems of those NPPs have also been developed together with the technology advancement. Control systems started with On-Off control using the relay logic, had been evolved into Solid-State logic using TTL ICs, and applied with the micro-processors since the Yonggwang NPP Units 3 and 4 which started its construction in 1989. Multiplexers are also installed at the local plant areas to collect field input and to send output signals while communicating with the controllers located in the system cabinetsmore » near the main control room in order to reduce the field wiring cables. The design of the digital control system technology for the NPPs in Korea has been optimized to maximize the operability as well as the safety through the design, construction, start-up and operation experiences. Both Shin-Kori Units 1 and 2 and Shin-Wolsong Units 1 and 2 NPP projects under construction are being progressed at the same time. Digital Plant Control Systems of these projects have adopted multi-loop controllers, redundant loop configuration, and soft control system for the radwaste system. Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) and Distributed Control System (DCS) are applied with soft control system in Shin-Kori Units 3 and 4. This paper describes the evolvement of control system at the NPPs in Korea and the experience and design improvement through the observation of the latest failure of the digital control system. In addition, design concept and its trend of the digital control system being applied to the NPP in Korea are introduced. (authors)« less
  • There are several unsettled technical and licensing issues in the areas of instrumentation and control (I and C), human factors, and updated control room designs that need coordinated, proactive industry attention. Some of these issues are already causing protracted regulatory reviews for existing plants, and left untreated, may cause substantial delays and increased costs for new plant combined construction and operating license approvals. Both industry and the NRC will have roles in resolving the key issues and addressing them in future design efforts and regulatory reviews. Where action is needed, the industry will want to minimize costs and risks bymore » defining industry consensus solutions with corresponding technical bases. NEI has formed a working group to coordinate industry efforts and communications with NRC staff. The working group will also help determine priorities and coordinate both new and existing plant resources. EPRI will provide technical input and guidance for the working group. In order to be able to conduct reviews in a timely fashion, the NRC will likely need to enhance and expand staff resources as existing plants are upgraded and new plant reviews become more active. The industry initiative began with a workshop sponsored by EPRI and NEI on March 28-29, 2006, which led to the creation of the NEI working group. The working group has now identified and prioritized important generic issues, established resolution paths and schedules, and identified the roles of various stakeholders including utility companies, EPRI, NEI, vendors and the NRC. Through the course of this initiative I and C issues for both existing and new plants are being addressed. This paper describes the key I and C related technical and regulatory issues and their implications for new and operating plants, and provides a status report on the efforts to resolve them. (authors)« less