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Title: Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer

Abstract

Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), compared with conventional 4-field treatment, can reduce the volume of bone marrow irradiated. Pelvic bone marrow sparing has produced a clinically significant reduction in hematologic toxicity (HT). This analysis investigated HT in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0418, a prospective study to test the feasibility of delivering postoperative IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer in a multiinstitutional setting. Methods and Materials: Patients in the RTOG 0418 study were treated with postoperative IMRT to 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics and vagina. Endometrial cancer patients received IMRT alone, whereas patients with cervical cancer received IMRT and weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}). Pelvic bone marrow was defined within the treatment field by using a computed tomography density-based autocontouring algorithm. The volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow were correlated with HT, graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Results: Eighty-three patients were eligible for analysis (43 with endometrial cancer and 40 with cervical cancer). Patients with cervical cancer treated with weekly cisplatin and pelvic IMRT had grades 1-5 HT (23%, 33%, 25%, 0%, and 0% of patients, respectively). Among patients withmore » cervical cancer, 83% received 5 or more cycles of cisplatin, and 90% received at least 4 cycles of cisplatin. The median percentage volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy in all 83 patients, respectively, was 96%, 84%, 61%, and 37%. Among cervical cancer patients with a V40 >37%, 75% had grade 2 or higher HT compared with 40% of patients with a V40 less than or equal to 37% (P =.025). Cervical cancer patients with a median bone marrow dose of >34.2 Gy also had higher rates of grade ≥2 HT than did those with a dose of ≤34.2 Gy (74% vs 43%, P=.049). Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT with weekly cisplatin is associated with low rates of HT and high rates of weekly cisplatin use. The volume of bone marrow receiving 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow correlated with higher rates of grade ≥2 toxicity among patients receiving weekly cisplatin (cervical cancer patients). Evaluation and limitation of the volume of bone marrow treated with pelvic IMRT is warranted in patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ; ;  [1];  [5];  [3];  [6];  [7];  [1]
  1. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)
  2. RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)
  3. Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States)
  4. Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)
  5. London Regional Cancer Center, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)
  6. Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)
  7. St. Luke's Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22224447
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 86; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ALGORITHMS; BONE MARROW; CHEMOTHERAPY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; FEMALE GENITALS; IRRADIATION; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org, Moughan, Jennifer, Portelance, Lorraine, Miller, Brigitte E., Salehpour, Mohammad R., Hildebrandt, Evangeline, Nuanjing, Jenny, D'Souza, David, Souhami, Luis, Small, William, Gaur, Rakesh, and Jhingran, Anuja. Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2013.01.017.
Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org, Moughan, Jennifer, Portelance, Lorraine, Miller, Brigitte E., Salehpour, Mohammad R., Hildebrandt, Evangeline, Nuanjing, Jenny, D'Souza, David, Souhami, Luis, Small, William, Gaur, Rakesh, & Jhingran, Anuja. Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2013.01.017.
Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org, Moughan, Jennifer, Portelance, Lorraine, Miller, Brigitte E., Salehpour, Mohammad R., Hildebrandt, Evangeline, Nuanjing, Jenny, D'Souza, David, Souhami, Luis, Small, William, Gaur, Rakesh, and Jhingran, Anuja. 2013. "Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2013.01.017.
@article{osti_22224447,
title = {Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer},
author = {Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org and Moughan, Jennifer and Portelance, Lorraine and Miller, Brigitte E. and Salehpour, Mohammad R. and Hildebrandt, Evangeline and Nuanjing, Jenny and D'Souza, David and Souhami, Luis and Small, William and Gaur, Rakesh and Jhingran, Anuja},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), compared with conventional 4-field treatment, can reduce the volume of bone marrow irradiated. Pelvic bone marrow sparing has produced a clinically significant reduction in hematologic toxicity (HT). This analysis investigated HT in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0418, a prospective study to test the feasibility of delivering postoperative IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer in a multiinstitutional setting. Methods and Materials: Patients in the RTOG 0418 study were treated with postoperative IMRT to 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics and vagina. Endometrial cancer patients received IMRT alone, whereas patients with cervical cancer received IMRT and weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}). Pelvic bone marrow was defined within the treatment field by using a computed tomography density-based autocontouring algorithm. The volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow were correlated with HT, graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Results: Eighty-three patients were eligible for analysis (43 with endometrial cancer and 40 with cervical cancer). Patients with cervical cancer treated with weekly cisplatin and pelvic IMRT had grades 1-5 HT (23%, 33%, 25%, 0%, and 0% of patients, respectively). Among patients with cervical cancer, 83% received 5 or more cycles of cisplatin, and 90% received at least 4 cycles of cisplatin. The median percentage volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy in all 83 patients, respectively, was 96%, 84%, 61%, and 37%. Among cervical cancer patients with a V40 >37%, 75% had grade 2 or higher HT compared with 40% of patients with a V40 less than or equal to 37% (P =.025). Cervical cancer patients with a median bone marrow dose of >34.2 Gy also had higher rates of grade ≥2 HT than did those with a dose of ≤34.2 Gy (74% vs 43%, P=.049). Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT with weekly cisplatin is associated with low rates of HT and high rates of weekly cisplatin use. The volume of bone marrow receiving 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow correlated with higher rates of grade ≥2 toxicity among patients receiving weekly cisplatin (cervical cancer patients). Evaluation and limitation of the volume of bone marrow treated with pelvic IMRT is warranted in patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2013.01.017},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 86,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 5
}
  • Purpose: To determine the feasibility of pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with endometrial cancer in a multi-institutional setting and to determine whether this treatment is associated with fewer short-term bowel adverse events than standard radiation therapy. Methods: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium treated with pelvic radiation therapy alone were eligible. Guidelines for target definition and delineation, dose prescription, and dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical normal structures were detailed in the study protocol and a web-based atlas. Results: Fifty-eight patients were accrued by 25 institutions; 43 were eligible for analysis. Forty-two patients (98%) had anmore » acceptable IMRT plan; 1 had an unacceptable variation from the prescribed dose to the nodal planning target volume. The proportions of cases in which doses to critical normal structures exceeded protocol criteria were as follows: bladder, 67%; rectum, 76%; bowel, 17%; and femoral heads, 33%. Twelve patients (28%) developed grade {>=}2 short-term bowel adverse events. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT for endometrial cancer is feasible across multiple institutions with use of a detailed protocol and centralized quality assurance (QA). For future trials, contouring of vaginal and nodal tissue will need continued monitoring with good QA and better definitions will be needed for organs at risk.« less
  • Purpose: To determine treatment-related acute toxicity rates in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by oral celecoxib, i.v. cisplatin and 5-FU, and concurrent pelvic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients on this RTOG Phase I-II study for advanced cervix cancer included FIGO Stage IIB-IVA or patients with FIGO Stage IB through IIA with biopsy proven pelvic node metastases or tumor size {>=}5 cm. Patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Celecoxib was prescribed at 400 mg twice daily beginning on day 1 for 1 year. Cisplatin (75 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1g/m2 for 4 days) were administered everymore » 3 weeks times 3. The primary end point of the study was treatment related toxicity. Results: Between August 2001 and March 2004, 84 patients were accrued to the study and 77 patients were evaluable for toxicity. Regarding the primary end point, toxicities were observed in the following areas: blood/bone marrow (16), gastrointestinal (14), pain (7), renal/genitourinary (6), cardiovascular (3), hemorrhage (1), and neurologic (1). For the first 75 evaluable patients, a toxicity failure was identified in 36 patients for a rate of 48%. Conclusions: Celecoxib at 400 mg twice daily together with concurrent cisplatin and 5-FU and pelvic radiotherapy has a high incidence of acute toxicities. The most frequent toxicities were hematologic. Albeit, the toxicity was deemed excessive in this trial, the rate of toxicities was not too different compared to other recent experiences with concurrent chemoradiation for advanced cervix cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To update the incidence of late toxicity of RTOG 9406, a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) dose escalation trial for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,084 men were registered to this Phase I/II trial of 3DCRT (eligible patients, 1,055). The dose for level I was 68.4 Gy; 73.8 Gy for level II; 79.2 Gy for level III; 74 Gy for level IV; and 78 Gy for level V. Patients in levels I to III received 1.8 Gy/fraction, and those in levels IV to V received 2.0 Gy/fraction. Disease group I patients were treated at the prostatemore » only, group 2 patients were treated at the prostate and at the seminal vesicles with a prostate boost, and group 3 patients were treated at the prostate and seminal vesicles. The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 6.1 y (level V) to 12.1 y (level I). Results: The incidence rates of RTOG grade 3 or less gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity were 3%, 4%, 6%, 7%, and 9% in group 1 and 6%, 2%, 6%, 9%, and 12% in group 2 at dose levels of I, II, III, IV, and V, respectively. In group 1, level V patients had a higher probability of grade2 late or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity than those in levels I, II, and III (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.93, p = 0.0101; HR = 2.29, p = 0.0007; HR = 2.52, p = 0.0002, respectively). In group 2, dose level V patients had a higher probability of grade 2 or greater late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity than those in dose levels II, III, and IV (HR = 2.61, p = 0.0002; HR = 2.22, p = 0.0051; HR = 1.60, p = 0.0276, respectively). Conclusions: Tolerance to high-dose 3DCRT remains excellent. There is significantly more grade 2 or greater toxicity with a dose of 78 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction than with 68.4 Gy to 79.2 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction and with 74 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction.« less
  • Purpose: To determine factors predictive for hematologic toxicity (HT) associated with concurrent chemoradiation for Stage II through IV cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 40 women receiving concurrent chemoradiation for cervical cancer were reviewed. Hematologic toxicity was defined by use of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Variables predicting for HT including age, body mass index, transfusions, and bone marrow volumes irradiated were included in the data analysis. Results: Of the patients, 13 (32.5%) had Grade 0 or 1 HT and 27 (67.5%) had Grade 2 through 4 HT (HT2+). Multiple logistic regression analysis ofmore » potential predictors showed that only the volume of bone receiving 20 Gy (V20) for whole pelvic bone tended toward significance for predicting HT2+. A strong correlation was noted between HT2+ and V20 (r = 0.8, p < 0.0001). A partitioning analysis to predict HT2+ showed a cutoff value of 79.42% (approximately 80%) for V20 of whole pelvic bone. That is, if the V20 of the whole pelvis exceeds 80%, the risk of HT2+ developing increases by a factor (odds ratio) of 4.5 (95%, confidence interval, 1.08-18.69) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We have shown a correlation between bone marrow volume radiated and development of HT. This has implications for use of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, which can potentially decrease the volume of bone marrow radiated.« less
  • Purpose: To review the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to evaluate postoperative high-risk cervical cancer patients for factors associated with a benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT) over external beam radiation therapy alone (EBRT). Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Database was queried for women with cervical cancer treated with hysterectomy and adjuvant EBRT from 2002 to 2012. Only patients with pathologic lymph node involvement (LN+), positive surgical margins, and/or parametrial invasion were included in our analysis (on the basis of Peter's criteria). Univariable and multivariable analyses (MVA) were performed, and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to investigatemore » for factors associated with of CRT utilization and overall survival (OS). Results: A total of 3053 patients met inclusion criteria, and 2479 received adjuvant CRT (81%), whereas 574 (19%) received EBRT alone. Factors associated with increased CRT utilization on MVA included age <69 years, year of diagnosis ≥2008, non-adenocarcinoma histology, and LN+. Use of CRT improved OS among the entire cohort on MVA (HR 0.76, CI 0.601-0.962; P=.022). On MVA, CRT improved OS in patients with LN+ as their sole Peter's criteria (HR 0.58, CI 0.413-0.814; P=.002). Chemoradiation therapy did not improve OS in patients with only positive margins (P=.73), only parametrial invasion (P=.95), or any combination of these 2 factors without LN+ (P=.63). Conclusions: The use of adjuvant CRT after hysterectomy improves OS in patients with high-risk cervical cancer compared with EBRT alone, but this benefit seems to be restricted to patients with LN+. The benefits of adjuvant CRT over EBRT alone in patients with parametrial invasion and/or positive margins (without nodal involvement) are unknown.« less