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Title: Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate respiratory gating accuracy and intrafractional consistency for abdominal cancer patients treated with respiratory gated treatment on a regular linear accelerator system. Methods and Materials: Twelve abdominal patients implanted with fiducials were treated with amplitude-based respiratory-gated radiation therapy. On the basis of daily orthogonal fluoroscopy, the operator readjusted the couch position and gating window such that the fiducial was within a setup margin (fiducial-planning target volume [f-PTV]) when RPM indicated “beam-ON.” Fifty-five pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic movie pairs with synchronized respiratory gating signal were recorded. Fiducial motion traces were extracted from the fluoroscopic movies using a template matching algorithm and correlated with f-PTV by registering the digitally reconstructed radiographs with the fluoroscopic movies. Treatment was determined to be “accurate” if 50% of the fiducial area stayed within f-PTV while beam-ON. For movie pairs that lost gating accuracy, a MATLAB program was used to assess whether the gating window was optimized, the external-internal correlation (EIC) changed, or the patient moved between movies. A series of safety margins from 0.5 mm to 3 mm was added to f-PTV for reassessing gating accuracy. Results: A decrease in gating accuracy was observed in 44% of movie pairs from daily fluoroscopic movies ofmore » 12 abdominal patients. Three main causes for inaccurate gating were identified as change of global EIC over time (∼43%), suboptimal gating setup (∼37%), and imperfect EIC within movie (∼13%). Conclusions: Inconsistent respiratory gating accuracy may occur within 1 treatment session even with a daily adjusted gating window. To improve or maintain gating accuracy during treatment, we suggest using at least a 2.5-mm safety margin to account for gating and setup uncertainties.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22224392
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCURACY; ALGORITHMS; CORRELATIONS; FLUOROSCOPY; IMAGES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY; SAFETY MARGINS

Citation Formats

Ge, Jiajia, Santanam, Lakshmi, Yang, Deshan, and Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu. Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.05.006.
Ge, Jiajia, Santanam, Lakshmi, Yang, Deshan, & Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu. Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.05.006.
Ge, Jiajia, Santanam, Lakshmi, Yang, Deshan, and Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu. 2013. "Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.05.006.
@article{osti_22224392,
title = {Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients},
author = {Ge, Jiajia and Santanam, Lakshmi and Yang, Deshan and Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate respiratory gating accuracy and intrafractional consistency for abdominal cancer patients treated with respiratory gated treatment on a regular linear accelerator system. Methods and Materials: Twelve abdominal patients implanted with fiducials were treated with amplitude-based respiratory-gated radiation therapy. On the basis of daily orthogonal fluoroscopy, the operator readjusted the couch position and gating window such that the fiducial was within a setup margin (fiducial-planning target volume [f-PTV]) when RPM indicated “beam-ON.” Fifty-five pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic movie pairs with synchronized respiratory gating signal were recorded. Fiducial motion traces were extracted from the fluoroscopic movies using a template matching algorithm and correlated with f-PTV by registering the digitally reconstructed radiographs with the fluoroscopic movies. Treatment was determined to be “accurate” if 50% of the fiducial area stayed within f-PTV while beam-ON. For movie pairs that lost gating accuracy, a MATLAB program was used to assess whether the gating window was optimized, the external-internal correlation (EIC) changed, or the patient moved between movies. A series of safety margins from 0.5 mm to 3 mm was added to f-PTV for reassessing gating accuracy. Results: A decrease in gating accuracy was observed in 44% of movie pairs from daily fluoroscopic movies of 12 abdominal patients. Three main causes for inaccurate gating were identified as change of global EIC over time (∼43%), suboptimal gating setup (∼37%), and imperfect EIC within movie (∼13%). Conclusions: Inconsistent respiratory gating accuracy may occur within 1 treatment session even with a daily adjusted gating window. To improve or maintain gating accuracy during treatment, we suggest using at least a 2.5-mm safety margin to account for gating and setup uncertainties.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.05.006},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 3
}
  • Purpose: AAPM TG-76 report advises lung patients experiencing tumor motion >5mm to use some form of motion management with even smaller limit for complex/special procedures like SBRT. Generally, either respiratory gating or abdominal compression is used for motion management. In this retrospective study, we are using an innovative index, Volumetric Indices (VI) = (GTVnn AND GTV{sub 50+}Xmm)/(GTVnn) to quantify how much of the tumor remains within 1, 2, and 3mm margins throughout the breathing cycle using GTV{sub 50+}Xmm margin on GTV{sub 50}[nn=0,10,20,…90]. Using appropriate limits, VI can provide tumor motion information and to check if RPM gates could have beenmore » used in conjunction with abdominal compression to better manage tumor motion. Methods: 64 SBRT patients with a total of 67 lung tumors were studied. 4DCT scans were taken, fully capturing tumor motion throughout the 10 phases of the breathing cycle. For each phase, Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) was segmented and appropriates structures were defined to determine VI values. For the 2mm margin, VI values less than 0.95 for peripheral lesions and 0.97 for central lesions indicate tumor movement greater than 4mm. VI values for 1mm and 3mm margins were also analyzed signifying tumor motion of 2mm & 6mm, respectively. Results: Of the 64 patients, 35 (55%) had motion greater than 4mm & could have benefited from respiratory gating. For 5/8 (63%) middle lobe lesions, 21/27 (78%) lower lobe lesions, and 10/32 (31%) upper lobe lesions, gating could have resulted in smaller ITV. 32/55 (58%) peripheral lesions and 4/12 (33%) central lesions could have had gating. Average ITV decreased by 1.25cc (11.43%) and average VI increased by 0.11. Conclusion: Out of 64 patients, 55% exhibited motion greater than 4mm even with abdominal compression. Even with abdominalcompression, lung tumors can move >4mm as the degree of pressure which a patient can tolerate, is patient specific.« less
  • Purpose: The correlation of the respiratory motion of external patient markers and abdominal tumors was examined. Data of this type are important for image-guided therapy techniques, such as respiratory gating, that monitor the movement of external fiducials. Methods and Materials: Fluoroscopy sessions for 4 patients with internal, radiopaque tumor fiducial clips were analyzed by computer vision techniques. The motion of the internal clips and the external markers placed on the patient's abdominal skin surface were quantified and correlated. Results: In general, the motion of the tumor and external markers were well correlated. The maximum amount of peak-to-peak craniocaudal tumor motionmore » was 2.5 cm. The ratio of tumor motion to external-marker motion ranged from 0.85 to 7.1. The variation in tumor position for a given external-marker position ranged from 2 to 9 mm. The period of the breathing cycle ranged from 2.7 to 4.5 seconds, and the frequency patterns for both the tumor and the external markers were similar. Conclusions: Although tumor motion generally correlated well with external fiducial marker motion, relatively large underlying tumor motion can occur compared with external-marker motion and variations in the tumor position for a given marker position. Treatment margins should be determined on the basis of a detailed understanding of tumor motion, as opposed to relying only on external-marker information.« less
  • Conformal external beam radiotherapy relies on accurate spatial positioning of the tumor and normal tissues during treatment. For abdominal patients, this is complicated by the motion of internal organs and the external patient contour due to respiration. As external motion influences the degree of accuracy achievable in patient setup, this motion was studied to provide indication of motions occurring during treatment, as well as to assess the technique of breath-holding at exhale (B-HEX). The motion of external abdominal points (anterior and right lateral) of a series of volunteers was tracked in real-time using an infrared tracking system, with the volunteersmore » in treatment position. The resulting motion data was assessed to evaluate (1) the change in position of each point per breath/breath-hold, (2) the change in position between breaths/breath-holds, and (3) the change in position across the whole recording time. Analysis shows that, for the anterior abdominal point, there is little difference in the variation of position with time for free-breathing as opposed to the B-HEX technique. For the lateral point however, the B-HEX technique reduces the motion during each treatment cycle (i.e., during the breath-hold) and over an extended period (i.e., during a series of breath-holds). The B-HEX technique thus provides greater accuracy for setup to lateral markers and provides the opportunity to reduce systematic and random localization errors.« less
  • Purpose: This study assesses the effect of physiological abdominal compression from prone positioning by comparing respiratory-induced tumor movements in supine and prone positions. Methods: 19 lung cancer patients underwent repeated supine and prone free-breathing 4DCT scans. The effect of patient position on motion magnitude was investigated for tumors, lymph nodes (9 cases), and subgroups of central (11 cases), peripheral (8 cases) and small peripheral tumors (5 cases), by evaluating the population average excursions, absolute and relative to a carina-point. Results: Absolute motion analysis: In prone, motion increased by ~20% for tumors and ~25% for lymph nodes. Central tumors moved moremore » compared to peripheral tumors in both supine and prone (~22%, and ~4% respectively). Central tumors movement increased by ~12% in prone. For peripheral tumors the increase in prone position was ~25% (~40% and 29% changes on along RL and AP directions). Motion relative to carina-point analysis: Overall, tumor excursions relative to carina-point increased by ~17% in prone. Lymph node relative magnitudes were lower by ~4%. Likewise, the central tumors moved ~7% less in prone. The subgroup of peripheral tumors exhibited increased amplitudes by ~44%; the small peripheral tumors had even larger relative displacements in prone (~46%). Conclusion: Tumor and lymph node movement in the patient population from this study averaged to be higher in prone than in supine position. Results from carina analysis also suggest that peripheral tissues have more physiologic freedom of motility when placed in the prone position, regardless of size. From these observations we should continue to avoid prone positioning for all types of primary lung tumor, suggesting that patients should receive radiotherapy for primary lung cancer in supine position to minimize target tissue mobility during normal respiratory effort. Further investigation will include more patients with peripheral tumors to validate our observations.« less
  • Purpose: Kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM) is a new real-time 3-dimensional image guidance method. Unlike previous real-time image guidance methods, KIM uses a standard linear accelerator without any additional equipment needed. The first prospective clinical trial of KIM is underway for prostate cancer radiation therapy. In this paper we report on the measured motion accuracy and precision using real-time KIM-guided gating. Methods and Materials: Imaging and motion information from the first 200 fractions from 6 patient prostate cancer radiation therapy volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments were analyzed. A 3-mm/5-second action threshold was used to trigger a gating event where the beammore » is paused and the couch position adjusted to realign the prostate to the treatment isocenter. To quantify the in vivo accuracy and precision, KIM was compared with simultaneously acquired kV/MV triangulation for 187 fractions. Results: KIM was successfully used in 197 of 200 fractions. Gating events occurred in 29 fractions (14.5%). In these 29 fractions, the percentage of beam-on time, the prostate displacement was >3 mm from the isocenter position, reduced from 73% without KIM to 24% with KIM-guided gating. Displacements >5 mm were reduced from 16% without KIM to 0% with KIM. The KIM accuracy was measured at <0.3 mm in all 3 dimensions. The KIM precision was <0.6 mm in all 3 dimensions. Conclusions: Clinical implementation of real-time KIM image guidance combined with gating for prostate cancer eliminates large prostate displacements during treatment delivery. Both in vivo KIM accuracy and precision are well below 1 mm.« less