skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

Abstract

Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicitymore » grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a dosimetric constraint when treating patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer with concurrent chemoradiation.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22224363
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CHEMOTHERAPY; INFLAMMATION; MEDICAL RECORDS; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; NEOPLASMS; PANCREAS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; REVIEWS; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Kelly, Patrick, Das, Prajnan, Pinnix, Chelsea C., Beddar, Sam, Briere, Tina, Pham, Mary, Krishnan, Sunil, Delclos, Marc E., and Crane, Christopher H., E-mail: ccrane@mdanderson.org. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.09.035.
Kelly, Patrick, Das, Prajnan, Pinnix, Chelsea C., Beddar, Sam, Briere, Tina, Pham, Mary, Krishnan, Sunil, Delclos, Marc E., & Crane, Christopher H., E-mail: ccrane@mdanderson.org. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.09.035.
Kelly, Patrick, Das, Prajnan, Pinnix, Chelsea C., Beddar, Sam, Briere, Tina, Pham, Mary, Krishnan, Sunil, Delclos, Marc E., and Crane, Christopher H., E-mail: ccrane@mdanderson.org. Fri . "Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.09.035.
@article{osti_22224363,
title = {Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer},
author = {Kelly, Patrick and Das, Prajnan and Pinnix, Chelsea C. and Beddar, Sam and Briere, Tina and Pham, Mary and Krishnan, Sunil and Delclos, Marc E. and Crane, Christopher H., E-mail: ccrane@mdanderson.org},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicity grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a dosimetric constraint when treating patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer with concurrent chemoradiation.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.09.035},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2013},
month = {Fri Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2013}
}
  • Introduction: Dose escalation for pancreas cancer is limited by the tolerance of adjacent normal tissues, especially with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The duodenum is generally considered to be the organ at greatest risk. This study reports on the dosimetric determinants of duodenal toxicity with single-fraction SBRT. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma received 25 Gy in a single fraction. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) endpoints evaluated include V{sub 5} (volume of duodenum that received 5 Gy), V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 25}, and D{sub max} (maximum dose to 1 cm{sup 3}). Normal tissue complication probabilitymore » (NTCP) was evaluated with a Lyman model. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models. Results: The median time to Grade 2-4 duodenal toxicity was 6.3 months (range, 1.6-11.8 months). The 6- and 12-month actuarial rates of toxicity were 11% and 29%, respectively. V{sub 10}-V{sub 25} and D{sub max} all correlated significantly with duodenal toxicity (p < 0.05). In particular, V{sub 15} {>=} 9.1 cm{sup 3} and V{sub 15} < 9.1 cm{sup 3} yielded duodenal toxicity rates of 52% and 11%, respectively (p = 0.002); V{sub 20} {>=} 3.3 cm{sup 3} and V{sub 20} < 3.3 cm{sup 3} gave toxicity rates of 52% and 11%, respectively (p = 0.002); and D{sub max} {>=} 23 Gy and D{sub max} < 23 Gy gave toxicity rates of 49% and 12%, respectively (p = 0.004). Lyman NTCP model optimization generated the coefficients m = 0.23, n = 0.12, and TD{sub 50} = 24.6 Gy. Only the Lyman NTCP model remained significant in multivariate analysis (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Multiple DVH endpoints and a Lyman NTCP model are strongly predictive of duodenal toxicity after SBRT for pancreatic cancer. These dose constraints will be valuable in future abdominal SBRT studies.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results:more » A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.« less
  • Purpose: Lymph node status is an important predictor of survival in pancreatic cancer. We performed a secondary analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9704, an adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiation trial, to determine the influence of lymph node factors-number of positive nodes (NPN), total nodes examined (TNE), and lymph node ratio (LNR ratio of NPN to TNE)-on OS and disease-free survival (DFS). Patient and Methods: Eligible patients from RTOG 9704 form the basis of this secondary analysis of lymph node parameters. Actuarial estimates for OS and DFS were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to evaluatemore » associations of NPN, TNE, and LNR with OS and DFS. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were also performed. Results: There were 538 patients enrolled in the RTOG 9704 trial. Of these, 445 patients were eligible with lymph nodes removed. Overall median NPN was 1 (min-max, 0-18). Increased NPN was associated with worse OS (HR = 1.06, p = 0.001) and DFS (HR = 1.05, p = 0.01). In multivariate analyses, both NPN and TNE were associated with OS and DFS. TNE > 12, and >15 were associated with increased OS for all patients, but not for node-negative patients (n = 142). Increased LNR was associated with worse OS (HR = 1.01, p < 0.0001) and DFS (HR = 1.006, p = 0.002). Conclusion: In patients who undergo surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation, TNE, NPN, and LNR are associated with OS and DFS. This secondary analysis of a prospective, cooperative group trial supports the influence of these lymph node parameters on outcomes after surgery and adjuvant therapy using contemporary techniques.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation with or without adjuvant gemcitabine (Gem). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 86 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent resection were treated with adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation. Thirty-four patients received concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation (5-FU/RT) with traditional field radiation (range, 45-61.2 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) without further adjuvant therapy. Thirty patients received traditional field 5-FU/RT (range, 45-60.4 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) with Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) either before and after radiotherapy or only after radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients received concurrent full-dose Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly)-based chemoradiationmore » (Gem/RT), consisting of involved-field radiation (range, 27-38 Gy; median, 36 Gy) followed by further adjuvant Gem. Results: The median age of the cohort was 65 years (range, 40-80 years). Of the patients, 58 had T3 tumors (67%), 22 had T2 tumors (26%), and 6 had T1 tumors (7%). N1 disease was present in 61 patients (71%), whereas 18 patients (21%) had R1 resections. Performance status, lymph node status, and margin status were all similar among the treatment groups. Median follow-up was 19.0 months. Median overall survival (OS) (19.2 months, 19.0 months, and 21.0 months) and 3-year OS rates (26.5%, 27.2%, and 32.1%) were similar among patients with 5-FU/RT with no adjuvant Gem, those with 5-FU/RT with adjuvant Gem, and those with Gem/RT with adjuvant Gem, respectively (p = 0.88). Patients who received adjuvant Gem had a similar median OS (22.1 months) and 3-year OS rate (29%) compared to patients who did not (19.2 months and 26.5%, respectively) (p = 0.62). There was a trend for improved 3-year OS rates in patients with R0 vs. R1 resections (28.1% vs. 14.2%, p = 0.06) and in patients with T1 and T2 vs. T3 tumors (38% vs. 20%, p = 0.09). Node-negative patients had an improved 3-year OS rate (30.1%) when compared with patients with N1 disease (16.2%) (p = 0.02). Conclusion: In our cohort of patients with resected pancreatic cancer, Gem chemotherapy did not improve OS after chemoradiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the incidence of duodenal toxicity in patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treatment of para-aortic nodes and to identify dosimetric parameters predictive of late duodenal toxicity. Methods and Materials: We identified 105 eligible patients with gynecologic malignancies who were treated with IMRT for gross metastatic disease in the para-aortic nodes from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2009. Patients were treated to a nodal clinical target volume to 45 to 50.4 Gy with a boost to 60 to 66 Gy. The duodenum was contoured, and dosimetric data were exported for analysis. Duodenal toxicity was scoredmore » according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Univariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and recursive partitioning analysis were used to determine associations between dosimetric variables and time to toxicity and to identify the optimal threshold that separated patients according to risk of toxicity. Results: Nine of the 105 patients experienced grade 2 to grade 5 duodenal toxicity, confirmed by endoscopy in all cases. The 3-year actuarial rate of any duodenal toxicity was 11.7%. A larger volume of the duodenum receiving 55 Gy (V55) was associated with higher rates of duodenal toxicity. The 3-year actuarial rates of duodenal toxicity with V55 above and below 15 cm{sup 3} were 48.6% and 7.4%, respectively (P<.01). In Cox univariate analysis of dosimetric variables, V55 was associated with duodenal toxicity (P=.029). In recursive partitioning analysis, V55 less than 13.94% segregated all patients with duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Dose-escalated IMRT can safely and effectively treat para-aortic nodal disease in gynecologic malignancies, provided that care is taken to limit the dose to the duodenum to reduce the risk of late duodenal toxicity. Limiting V55 to below 15 cm{sup 3} may reduce the risk of duodenal complications. In cases where the treatment cannot be delivered within these constraints, consideration should be given to other treatment approaches such as resection or initial chemotherapy.« less