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Title: ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C

Abstract

Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from Hα and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of 'counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s{sup –1}) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIAmore » cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [4]; ;  [5]; ;  [6];  [7];  [8]
  1. Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)
  2. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)
  3. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
  4. Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)
  5. School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)
  6. Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA (United States)
  7. Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)
  8. P.N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22224073
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 775; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COLD PLASMA; ENERGY BALANCE; EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; FILAMENTS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SUN; THICKNESS; VELOCITY; WIDTH

Citation Formats

Alexander, Caroline E., Walsh, Robert W., Régnier, Stéphane, Cirtain, Jonathan, Winebarger, Amy R., Golub, Leon, Korreck, Kelly, Weber, Mark, Kobayashi, Ken, Platt, Simon, Mitchell, Nick, DePontieu, Bart, Title, Alan, DeForest, Craig, and Kuzin, Sergey. ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/775/1/L32.
Alexander, Caroline E., Walsh, Robert W., Régnier, Stéphane, Cirtain, Jonathan, Winebarger, Amy R., Golub, Leon, Korreck, Kelly, Weber, Mark, Kobayashi, Ken, Platt, Simon, Mitchell, Nick, DePontieu, Bart, Title, Alan, DeForest, Craig, & Kuzin, Sergey. ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C. United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/775/1/L32.
Alexander, Caroline E., Walsh, Robert W., Régnier, Stéphane, Cirtain, Jonathan, Winebarger, Amy R., Golub, Leon, Korreck, Kelly, Weber, Mark, Kobayashi, Ken, Platt, Simon, Mitchell, Nick, DePontieu, Bart, Title, Alan, DeForest, Craig, and Kuzin, Sergey. Fri . "ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C". United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/775/1/L32.
@article{osti_22224073,
title = {ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C},
author = {Alexander, Caroline E. and Walsh, Robert W. and Régnier, Stéphane and Cirtain, Jonathan and Winebarger, Amy R. and Golub, Leon and Korreck, Kelly and Weber, Mark and Kobayashi, Ken and Platt, Simon and Mitchell, Nick and DePontieu, Bart and Title, Alan and DeForest, Craig and Kuzin, Sergey},
abstractNote = {Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from Hα and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of 'counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s{sup –1}) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.},
doi = {10.1088/2041-8205/775/1/L32},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 775,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 20 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Fri Sep 20 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}
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