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Title: YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

Abstract

Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of roliprammore » (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation. ► The combined effects were reversed by H89. ► The combination of rolipram and PGE1 triggered NO production and iNOS expression. ► Effect of YC-1 occurred through inhibition of cAMP-specific PDE.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)
  2. (China)
  3. Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chia-Yi, Taiwan (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22215298
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 260; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AMP; DISEASES; INFLAMMATION; INHIBITION; LUNGS; MACROPHAGES; NITRIC OXIDE; PATHOGENESIS; PHOSPHORYLATION; PROSTAGLANDINS; PROTEINS; RATS

Citation Formats

Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw, Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan, Tang, Ming-Chi, Kuo, Liang-Mou, Chang, Wen-De, Chung, Pei-Jen, Chang, Ya-Wen, and Fang, Yao-Ching. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2012.02.011.
Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw, Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan, Tang, Ming-Chi, Kuo, Liang-Mou, Chang, Wen-De, Chung, Pei-Jen, Chang, Ya-Wen, & Fang, Yao-Ching. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2012.02.011.
Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw, Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan, Tang, Ming-Chi, Kuo, Liang-Mou, Chang, Wen-De, Chung, Pei-Jen, Chang, Ya-Wen, and Fang, Yao-Ching. 2012. "YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2012.02.011.
@article{osti_22215298,
title = {YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages},
author = {Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw and Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan and Tang, Ming-Chi and Kuo, Liang-Mou and Chang, Wen-De and Chung, Pei-Jen and Chang, Ya-Wen and Fang, Yao-Ching},
abstractNote = {Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation. ► The combined effects were reversed by H89. ► The combination of rolipram and PGE1 triggered NO production and iNOS expression. ► Effect of YC-1 occurred through inhibition of cAMP-specific PDE.},
doi = {10.1016/J.TAAP.2012.02.011},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 2,
volume = 260,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 4
}
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